Londina Illustrata. Graphic and Historical Memorials of Monasteries, Churches, Chapels, Schools, Charitable Foundations, Palaces, Halls, Courts, Processions, Places of Early Amusement, and Modern Present Theatres, in the Cities and Suburbs of London and Westminster, Volume 2

Wilkinson, Robert
1819-1825

Furnival's Inn, Holborn. Taken down in 1818.

Furnival's Inn, Holborn. Taken down in 1818.

Furnival's Inn, Holborn.

West View of the Interior of Furnivals Inn.

North view of the Interior of Furnivals Inn.

Interior of the Hall of Furnivals Inn.

The Inns of Court are stated to owe their first establishment to King Henry III. who having in the year 1225 con firmed the charters granted by John his father, removed the Courts of Justice from his Palace into Westminster Hall; about which time, the lawyers, or practitioners in their Courts, began to form themselves into a Society (supposed at Thavie's Inn, in Holborn) in a collegiate manner; hence their place of residence was denominated an Inn, or House of Court: and Henry III. by his mandate, directed to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London, about the year 1244, strictly enjoined them to make proclamation throughout the City, that no person whatsoever should presume to set up a School or Schools therein, for the teaching Law. In each of these Societies mootings were held, that is public meetings for the instruction of Students, wherein are argued divers abstruse points of Law, after the manner of trials in the Courts of Justice.

Furnival's Inn is an Inn of Chancery, situated on the north side of Holborn, and is first noticed as a Law Seminary in the Steward's Account-book, written about the ninth of King Henry IV. and derives its name, like most of the other Inns, from its original proprietors, the Lords Furnival. This noble family became extinct in the male line in the sixth year of Richard II. some time before which period this Inn was demised by the Students of the Law, as is evident from the above circumstance; but the precise date of its first legal establishment is unknown.

By Joan, the daughter and heir to William Lord Furnival, in the time of the former monarch (Henry IV.), the inheritance of Furnival's Inn came to Thomas Nevill, younger brother to Ralph Earl of Westmoreland; and by Maude, sole daughter and heir to the said Thomas and Joan, it afterwards descended to John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury. In this line it continued till Francis Earl of Shrewsbury, in consideration of £ 120., by his deed, bearing date the 16th day of December, 1 Edw. VI., sold it to Edward Gryffin, Esq. then Solicitor-General to the King, William Ropere, and Richard Heydone, Esqs. and their heirs, to the use of the Society of Lincoln's Inn; which sum of £ 120. (the purchase-money) was paid out of the treasury of that Society, and is entered in their register. The Principal and Fellows of Furnival's Inn, to whom a lease was granted by the Society of Lincoln's Inn, were to pay yearly £ 3. 6s 4d, as appears by the accounts of that house, and by special orders there made, they were allowed several privileges as follows: First in 10 Eliz. it was ordered, that the utter Barristers of Furnival's Inn, of a year's continuance, and so certified and allowed by the Benchers of Lincoln's Inn, should pay no more than four marks apiece for their admittance into that Society. The following year a like order was made, and every Fellow of this Inn, who had been allowed an utter Barrister here, and that had mooted here for two vacations at the utter bar, should pay no more for his admission into the Society of Lincoln's Inn than 13s. 4d. though all utter Barristers of any other Inn of Chancery, excepting Thaivie's Inn, should pay 20s.; and that every inner Barrister of this House, who had mooted here one vacation at the inner bar, should pay for his admission into this House, but 20s.; those of other houses (excepting Thaivie's Inn) paying 26s. 8d.

Also, when by an order made at Lincoln's Inn, in 27 Eliz. the admission of the gentlemen of this House and Thaivie's Inn into that Society, was raised to 40s. those of other Inns of Chancery were strained to five marks; and in 36 Eliz. those of this House had so much farther favour, that they might, after their admittance into Lincoln's Inn, stay two years in the Inn of Chancery, paying their pensions during those two years; and that they should be discharged of casting into commons, and of all the vacations and changes of Christmas, during the time of their stay here for those first two years.

Amongst other rules and orders hung up in the buttery of Lincoln's Inn, were the following, respecting the ancient mootings of this Society, and those of Thaivie's Inn: "In the Reading.

"Mootes in Furnivall's Inn, every Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, and Saturday, during the reading; but no exercise after the readers feast."

This Inn occupies a very considerable plot of ground, and is divided into two squares or courts. The first towards Holborn is of a good width, but shallow, and built round on the four sides. The second, or inner court, extends the depth of great part of Brook Street, and has chambers on one side only: the date of the buildings is about the time of Charles the Second.

Previous to being taken down in 1818, the hall was seen on entering the gateway next the street, but its aspect was by no means calculated to make a favourable impression on a spectator. It was a low plain brick building, with a small turret, and two large projecting bow windows at the west end, and was, like the rest of the Inn, in a most neglected state. The north side of it, on passing through the passage or entrance to the inner court, with a small range of old chambers that adjoined, and whose fronts were plastered in the cottage style, had a singularly rustic appearance, bearing a much greater resemblance to a country village than a London Inn of Chancery.

The interior of the hall bore signs of greater antiquity than any other part of the building; its dimensions were 40 feet by 24. The roof was of timber, arched, and divided into pannels by ribs springing from the sides; the floor at the upper end of the hall was raised for the Principals, as at the Middle Temple, &c. It had in like manner a fireplace in the midst, and the same disposition of tables and benches; but they had no appearance, nor indeed the hall itself, of being often used. In the windows of this hall were a few armorial bearings; it likewise contained portraits of Lords Raymond and Pengelly.

The Society of Furnival's Inn was governed by a Principal and twelve ancients; and the numbers were to be in commons a fortnight in every term, or pay two shillings per week if absent.

Their arms are, argent a bend between six martlets, gules within a border of the second.

Furnival's Inn is thought by many to have been built after a design of Inigo Jones, but it bore not the least resemblance to the classical works of that great architect: the roof exhibited a jumble of inconsistencies irreconcilable with the taste and judgment of that master who stood forward as the first artist in his way of the time.

During the taking down of the old building, to clear the foundation for the structure now erected, an accident happened in Furnival's Inn Court, by the falling of a wall, that separated it from the Inn, which from the injudicious heaping of rubbish against it, more than its strength could bear, gave way, and buried two children in the ruins.

The view represents the front of this building, accurately delineated immediately previous to its demolition; the entrance seen to the left, is that of Furnival's Inn Court; and the inn-yard from which the stage-coach is issuing is the yard of the Bell and Crown Inn, Holborn.

The cellar adjoining to Furnival's Inn gate, merits notice from the following circumstances, well attested: it had long been frequented as an ale and cyder cellar, and falling into the hands of one John Grey, who, after many years' application and industry, realized a sum of money, sufficient to purchase in Yorkshire, the place of his nativity, an estate of nearly £ 400. per annum; when, having resided upon it a certain time, he grew weary of retirement, and pining for his former active situation, absolutely returned to London, and endeavoured to purchase his old cellar; but not succeeding, he proposed becoming a waiter, was accepted as such, and lived there several years, receiving a salary until he died.

 

 

 

 

The Inns of Court are stated to owe their establishment to King Henry III. who having in the year con firmed the charters granted by John his father, removed the Courts of Justice from his Palace into Hall; about which time, the lawyers, or practitioners in their Courts, began to form themselves into a Society (supposed at Thavie's Inn, in ) in a collegiate manner; hence their place of residence was denominated an Inn, or House of Court: and Henry III. by his mandate, directed to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London, about the year , strictly enjoined them to make proclamation throughout the City, that no person whatsoever should presume to set up a School or Schools therein, for the teaching Law. In each of these Societies mootings were held, that is public meetings for the instruction of Students, wherein are argued divers abstruse points of Law, after the manner of trials in the Courts of Justice.

is an Inn of Chancery, situated on the north side of , and is noticed as a Law Seminary in the Steward's Account-book, written about the of King Henry IV. and derives its name, like most of the other Inns, from its original proprietors, the Lords Furnival. This noble family became extinct in the male line in the year of Richard II. some time before which period this Inn was demised by the Students of the Law, as is evident from the above circumstance; but the precise date of its legal establishment is unknown.

By Joan, the daughter and heir to William Lord Furnival, in the time of the former monarch (Henry IV.), the inheritance of came to Thomas Nevill, younger brother to Ralph Earl of Westmoreland; and by Maude, sole daughter and heir to the said Thomas and Joan, it afterwards descended to John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury. In this line it continued till Francis Earl of Shrewsbury, in consideration of ., by his deed, bearing date the , Edw. VI., sold it to Edward Gryffin, Esq. then Solicitor-General to the King, William Ropere, and Richard Heydone, Esqs. and their heirs, to the use of the Society of ; which sum of . (the purchase-money) was paid out of the treasury of that Society, and is entered in their register. The Principal and Fellows of , to whom a lease was granted by the Society of , were to pay yearly . , as appears by the accounts of that house, and by special orders there made, they were allowed several privileges as follows: in Eliz. it was ordered, that the utter Barristers of , of a year's continuance, and so certified and allowed by the Benchers of , should pay no more than apiece for their admittance into that Society. The following year a like order was made, and every Fellow of this Inn, who had been allowed an utter Barrister here, and that had mooted here for vacations at the utter bar, should pay no more for his admission into the Society of than though all utter Barristers of any other Inn of Chancery, excepting Thaivie's Inn, should pay ; and that every inner Barrister of this House, who had mooted here vacation at the inner bar, should pay for his admission into this House, but ; those of other houses (excepting Thaivie's Inn) paying

Also, when by an order made at , in Eliz. the admission of the gentlemen of this House and Thaivie's Inn into that Society, was raised to those of other Inns of Chancery were strained to ; and in Eliz. those of this House had so much farther favour, that they might, after their admittance into , stay years in the Inn of Chancery, paying their pensions during those years; and that they should be discharged of casting into commons, and of all the vacations and changes of Christmas, during the time of their stay here for those years.

Amongst other rules and orders hung up in the buttery of , were the following, respecting the ancient mootings of this Society, and those of Thaivie's Inn:

"Mootes in Furnivall's Inn, every Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, and Saturday, during the reading; but no exercise after the readers feast."

This Inn occupies a very considerable plot of ground, and is divided into squares or courts. The towards is of a good width, but shallow, and built round on the sides. The , or inner court, extends the

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depth of great part of , and has chambers on side only: the date of the buildings is about the time of Charles the .

Previous to being taken down in , the hall was seen on entering the gateway next the street, but its aspect was by no means calculated to make a favourable impression on a spectator. It was a low plain brick building, with a small turret, and large projecting bow windows at the west end, and was, like the rest of the Inn, in a most neglected state. The north side of it, on passing through the passage or entrance to the inner court, with a small range of old chambers that adjoined, and whose fronts were plastered in the cottage style, had a singularly rustic appearance, bearing a much greater resemblance to a country village than a London Inn of Chancery.

The interior of the hall bore signs of greater antiquity than any other part of the building; its dimensions were feet by . The roof was of timber, arched, and divided into pannels by ribs springing from the sides; the floor at the upper end of the hall was raised for the Principals, as at the Middle Temple, &c. It had in like manner a fireplace in the midst, and the same disposition of tables and benches; but they had no appearance, nor indeed the hall itself, of being often used. In the windows of this hall were a few armorial bearings; it likewise contained portraits of Lords Raymond and Pengelly.

The Society of was governed by a Principal and ancients; and the numbers were to be in commons a fortnight in every term, or pay per week if absent.

Their arms are, argent a bend between martlets, gules within a border of the .

is thought by many to have been built after a design of Inigo Jones, but it bore not the least resemblance to the classical works of that great architect: the roof exhibited a jumble of inconsistencies irreconcilable with the taste and judgment of that master who stood forward as the artist in his way of the time.

During the taking down of the old building, to clear the foundation for the structure now erected, an accident happened in Court, by the falling of a wall, that separated it from the Inn, which from the injudicious heaping of rubbish against it, more than its strength could bear, gave way, and buried children in the ruins.

The view represents the front of this building, accurately delineated immediately previous to its demolition; the entrance seen to the left, is that of Court; and the inn-yard from which the stage-coach is issuing is the yard of the Bell and Crown Inn, .

The cellar adjoining to gate, merits notice from the following circumstances, well attested: it had long been frequented as an ale and cyder cellar, and falling into the hands of John Grey, who, after many years' application and industry, realized a sum of money, sufficient to purchase in Yorkshire, the place of his nativity, an estate of nearly . per annum; when, having resided upon it a certain time, he grew weary of retirement, and pining for his former active situation, absolutely returned to London, and endeavoured to purchase his old cellar; but not succeeding, he proposed becoming a waiter, was accepted as such, and lived there several years, receiving a salary until he died.

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 Title Page
collapseCourts, Halls, and Public Buildings
collapseSchools
collapseAlms-Houses, Hospitals, &c.
collapsePlaces of Amusement
collapseMiscellaneous Objects of Antiquity
collapseAncient and Modern Theatres
collapseTheatres
The Bull and the Bear Baiting,
The Red Bull Playhouse, Clerkenwell.
Fortune Theatre
Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre
D'Avenant's Theatre Otherwise the Duke's Theatre, Little Lincoln's Inn Fields
Theatre Royal, Drury Lane
Destruction of Drury Lane Theatre by Fire
Opening of Drury Lane New Theatre
Theatre Royal, Covent Garden
The New Theatre Royal, Covent Garden.
Theatre Royal, Haymarket
New Theatre Royal, Haymarket
The King's Theatre, or the Italian Opera, Haymarket
Theatre in Goodman's Fields. The whole of Goodman's Fields was formerly a farm belonging to the Abbey of Nuns, of the Order of St. Clare, called the Minories or Minoresses, from certain poor ladies of that order; and so late as the time of Stow, when he wrote his Survey in 1598, was let out in gardens, and for grazing horses. One Trolop, and afterwards Goodman, were the farmers there. But Goodman's son being heir by his father's purchase, let the grounds in parcels, and lived like a gentleman on its produce. He lies buried in St. Botolph's church, Aldgate.
The Royalty Theatre, Wellclose Square
The Tennis Court Theatre, Bear Yard, Little Lincoln's Inn Fields
Olympic Theatre, Newcastle Street, Strand
Sadler's Wells.
The Pantheon Theatre, Oxford Street
Strand Theatre, the Sans Pareil
Astley's Amphitheatre, Westminster Road
The Regency Theatre. Tottenham Street Tottenham Court Road
The Cobourg Theatre
Royal Circus or Surrey Theatre
Lyceum Theatre, or English Opera, Strand.
Theatre in Tankard Street, Ipswich
Checks and Tickets of Admission to the public Theatres and other Places of Amusement.

Title page of Vol. 2 reads: Theatrum illustrata. Graphic and historic memorials of ancient playhouses, modern theatres and other places of public amusement in the cities and suburbs of London & Westminster with scenic and incidental illustrations from the time of Shakspear to the present period.

This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--Antiquities
London (England)--Description and Travel
Wilkinson, Robert, d. ca. 1825
Bolles, Edwin Courtlandt
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/53839
ID: tufts:MS004.002.057.001.00001
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
Usage: Detailed Rights