Londina Illustrata. Graphic and Historical Memorials of Monasteries, Churches, Chapels, Schools, Charitable Foundations, Palaces, Halls, Courts, Processions, Places of Early Amusement, and Modern Present Theatres, in the Cities and Suburbs of London and Westminster, Volume 2

Wilkinson, Robert
1819-1825

Interior of Salters' Hall Meeting House.

Interior of Salters' Hall Meeting House.

Interior of the Salters Hall Meeting.

The Meeting-house in Salters' Hall Court, adjoining the Hall, and originally constituting a part of it, was a substantial brick building, fitted up soon after the Revolution, for a congregation of Protestant dissenters, who had been previously used to assemble for divine worship at Buckingham House, on College Hill. It was a large building, having four galleries, and was esteemed as one of the most celebrated places of worship among the Dissenters. From its centrical and retired situation, it had often been chosen as a suitable place for carrying on lectures, or for holding the meetings of Ministers, for the purpose of considering questions of importance, relative to the welfare of the dissenting interest in general.

Mr. Richard Mayo was the pastor of the church who first assembled here; he continued till his death, September 8, 1695, when he was succeeded by Mr. Nathaniel Taylor, at whose death, in April 1702, Mr. William Tong was chosen to fill the office, which he did with much acceptance and usefulness, till March 1726-7. But Mr. John Newman, who had been assistant to Mr. Taylor, being very acceptable to the people, Mr. Tong proposed that he should be appointed co-pastor with him, which was accordingly done in 1716; and after Mr. Tong's death Mr. Newman continued sole pastor till July 1741, when he was called to his rest. Mr. John Barker was appointed to succeed him in the pastoral office, and the next year Mr. Francis Spilsbury was associated with him as co-pastor. Mr. Barker continued in office till the spring of 1762, when severe bodily affliction compelled him to resign it; but Mr. Spilsbury remained sole pastor till his death, in March 1782, when Mr. Hugh Worthington and Mr. Robert Jacomb were ordained as co-pastors. Mr. Jacomb resigned his situation in 1790, and Mr. Worthington continued sole pastor till his death in July 1813, when he was succeeded by Dr. W. B. Collyer, the present pastor.

In 1820 the Salters' Company, having come to a determination to rebuild their hall, gave notice to the managers of the church and congregation that they must quit the premises at Lady Day 1821. It became necessary therefore to provide another place for them to assemble in, and at length some houses were purchased in Oxford Court, within a few yards of the place which they had so long occupied. These being taken down a handsome building was erected on the spot, which was opened for divine worship on Tuesday, June 4th, 1822; the old Meetinghouse, together with the Hall, having just before been levelled with the ground.

The first Lecture carried on here was a branch of the Merchants' lecture, established A. D. 1672, at Pinners' Hall, in Old Broad Street. In 1695, differences having arisen among the lecturers, some of whom were Presbyterians and others Independents, the Presbyterians withdrew and carried on a lecture here, on the same day and at the same hour as they had been used to do at Pinners' Hall. This was continued by a succession of Presbyterian Ministers, till 1795; when, being but thinly attended, it was finally given up. The next lecture established here was on Lord's day evenings, and was begun in the reign of King William the Third. This was for a great many years extremely popular. The first Minister who conducted it was the Rev. Robert Bragge, who, after some time, removed it to his own Meeting-house in Lime Street. It was soon after recommenced at this place by the celebrated Mr. Thomas Bradbury, who delivered it to crowded audiences for more than twenty years. In 1725 he resigned his lectureship and was succeeded by the Rev. Samuel Baker, who was followed by several Presbyterian Ministers, some of considerable eminence, as Dr. Wm. Prior, Dr. Abm. Rees, Dr. Philip Furneaux, and Mr Hugh Worthington; it was continued by various ministers, of different denominations, till 1812, when, being ill attended, it was given up. A lecture, on a Wednesday evening, was also carried on here for several years, and was discontinued in 1809. In 1735, a course of lectures were delivered here against the principal errors of the church of Rome, which were published in two volumes octavo. But it was especially remarkable for being the place where the general body of Dissenting Ministers met in February 1719, to consider of the best means of opposing the spread of Arian sentiments, which had made considerable progress in the west of England; some were for subscribing a declaration as a test of Orthodoxy, others opposed it as an infringement of the rights of private judgment; the numbers were nearly equal on both sides; much ill-nature was displayed, and animosity excited, but no good was produced, though it gave occasion to their enemies to speak evil against them, and was very unfriendly to the interests of true religion.

 

The Meeting-house in Salters' Hall Court, adjoining the Hall, and originally constituting a part of it, was a substantial brick building, fitted up soon after the Revolution, for a congregation of Protestant dissenters, who had been previously used to assemble for divine worship at Buckingham House, on . It was a large building, having galleries, and was esteemed as of the most celebrated places of worship among the Dissenters. From its centrical and retired situation, it had often been chosen as a suitable place for carrying on lectures, or for holding the meetings of Ministers, for the purpose of considering questions of importance, relative to the welfare of the dissenting interest in general.

Mr. Richard Mayo was the pastor of the church who assembled here; he continued till his death, , when he was succeeded by Mr. Nathaniel Taylor, at whose death, in , Mr. William Tong was chosen to fill the office, which he did with much acceptance and usefulness, till -. But Mr. John Newman, who had been assistant to Mr. Taylor, being very acceptable to the people, Mr. Tong proposed that he should be appointed co-pastor with him, which was accordingly done in ; and after Mr. Tong's death Mr. Newman continued sole pastor till , when he was called to his rest. Mr. John Barker was appointed to succeed him in the pastoral office, and the next year Mr. Francis Spilsbury was associated with him as co-pastor. Mr. Barker continued in office till the spring of , when severe bodily affliction compelled him to resign it; but Mr. Spilsbury remained sole pastor till his death, in , when Mr. Hugh Worthington and Mr. Robert Jacomb were ordained as co-pastors. Mr. Jacomb resigned his situation in , and Mr. Worthington continued sole pastor till his death in , when he was succeeded by Dr. W. B. Collyer, the present pastor.

In the Salters' Company, having come to a determination to rebuild their hall, gave notice to the managers of the church and congregation that they must quit the premises at Lady Day . It became necessary therefore to provide another place for them to assemble in, and at length some houses were purchased in , within a few yards of the place which they had so long occupied. These being taken down a handsome building was erected on the spot, which was opened for divine worship on Tuesday, ; the old Meetinghouse, together with the Hall, having just before been levelled with the ground.

The Lecture carried on here was a branch of the Merchants' lecture, established A. D. , at Pinners' Hall, in . In , differences having arisen among the lecturers, some of whom were Presbyterians and others Independents, the Presbyterians withdrew and carried on a lecture here, on the same day and at the same hour as they had been used to do at Pinners' Hall. This was continued by a succession of Presbyterian Ministers, till ; when, being but thinly attended, it was finally given up. The next lecture established here was on Lord's day evenings, and was begun in the reign of King William the . This was for a great many years extremely popular. The Minister who conducted it was the Rev. Robert Bragge, who, after some time, removed it to his own Meeting-house in . It was soon after recommenced at this place by the celebrated Mr. Thomas Bradbury, who delivered it to crowded audiences for more than years. In he resigned his lectureship and was succeeded by the Rev. Samuel Baker, who was followed by several Presbyterian Ministers, some of considerable eminence, as Dr. Wm. Prior, Dr. Abm. Rees, Dr. Philip Furneaux, and Mr Hugh Worthington; it was continued by various ministers, of different denominations, till , when, being ill attended, it was given up. A lecture, on a Wednesday evening, was also carried on here for several years, and was discontinued in . In , a course of lectures were delivered here against the principal errors of the church of Rome, which were published in volumes octavo. But it was especially remarkable for being the place where the general body of Dissenting Ministers met in , to consider of the best means of opposing the spread of Arian sentiments, which had made considerable progress in the west of England; some were for subscribing a declaration as a test of Orthodoxy, others opposed it as an infringement of the rights of private judgment; the numbers were nearly equal on both sides; much ill-nature was displayed, and animosity excited, but no good was produced, though it gave occasion to their enemies to speak evil against them, and was very unfriendly to the interests of true religion.

35

 
 
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 Title Page
collapseCourts, Halls, and Public Buildings
collapseSchools
collapseAlms-Houses, Hospitals, &c.
collapsePlaces of Amusement
collapseMiscellaneous Objects of Antiquity
collapseAncient and Modern Theatres
collapseTheatres
The Bull and the Bear Baiting,
The Red Bull Playhouse, Clerkenwell.
Fortune Theatre
Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre
D'Avenant's Theatre Otherwise the Duke's Theatre, Little Lincoln's Inn Fields
Theatre Royal, Drury Lane
Destruction of Drury Lane Theatre by Fire
Opening of Drury Lane New Theatre
Theatre Royal, Covent Garden
The New Theatre Royal, Covent Garden.
Theatre Royal, Haymarket
New Theatre Royal, Haymarket
The King's Theatre, or the Italian Opera, Haymarket
Theatre in Goodman's Fields. The whole of Goodman's Fields was formerly a farm belonging to the Abbey of Nuns, of the Order of St. Clare, called the Minories or Minoresses, from certain poor ladies of that order; and so late as the time of Stow, when he wrote his Survey in 1598, was let out in gardens, and for grazing horses. One Trolop, and afterwards Goodman, were the farmers there. But Goodman's son being heir by his father's purchase, let the grounds in parcels, and lived like a gentleman on its produce. He lies buried in St. Botolph's church, Aldgate.
The Royalty Theatre, Wellclose Square
The Tennis Court Theatre, Bear Yard, Little Lincoln's Inn Fields
Olympic Theatre, Newcastle Street, Strand
Sadler's Wells.
The Pantheon Theatre, Oxford Street
Strand Theatre, the Sans Pareil
Astley's Amphitheatre, Westminster Road
The Regency Theatre. Tottenham Street Tottenham Court Road
The Cobourg Theatre
Royal Circus or Surrey Theatre
Lyceum Theatre, or English Opera, Strand.
Theatre in Tankard Street, Ipswich
Checks and Tickets of Admission to the public Theatres and other Places of Amusement.

Title page of Vol. 2 reads: Theatrum illustrata. Graphic and historic memorials of ancient playhouses, modern theatres and other places of public amusement in the cities and suburbs of London & Westminster with scenic and incidental illustrations from the time of Shakspear to the present period.

This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--Antiquities
London (England)--Description and Travel
Wilkinson, Robert, d. ca. 1825
Bolles, Edwin Courtlandt
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/53839
ID: tufts:MS004.002.057.001.00001
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
Usage: Detailed Rights