Concise Encyclopedia of Tufts History

Sauer, Anne
Branco, Jessica
Bennett, John
Crowley, Zachary
2000

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 1906

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 1906

Although Dr. William Chipman, a professor of surgery, taught students about fractures and dislocations during the school's first few years, orthopedic surgery was first taught by Dr. Charles E. Painter in 1897. At that time the teaching of this discipline consisted of lectures and a clinical exposure for fourth-year students at the Boston Dispensary.

Dr. Painter was appointed the first professor and chair of this division in 1906; he also served as chief of orthopedic surgery at the Carney Hospital. During his tenure, the Massachusetts General Hospital (1913) and the Carney Hospital (1914) began to participate in the program.

Teaching was concentrated at the Massachusetts General Hospital while Dr. Mark Rogers was chairman - from 1925 to 1940 - although students were also exposed to orthopedic patients at both the Boston City and Beth Israel Hospitals. In 1949 St. Elizabeth's Hospital began to provide student teaching; however, after 1952 student teaching was concentrated primarily at the Boston City Hospital, since Drs. Russell Sullivan (1941-1954) and Alexander Aitken (1954-1965), Dr. Rogers' successors, held appointments there.

Dr. Arthur Thibodeau, an expert on the management of spine problems who was chair of the division from 1965 to 1970, introduced an orthopedic residency at both the New England Medical Center and the Boston Veterans Administration Medical Center. He was also responsible for training generations of clinically oriented orthopedic surgeons.

After Dr. Henry H. Banks, M1945, was named chairman in 1970, he initiated a reorganization of the division. During his tenure, a full-time faculty was recruited with a practice plan based at the medical school, and departmental status was given to orthopedic surgery. Space for offices and ambulatory patient care was obtained at the New England Medical Center, where strong divisions of pediatric orthopedics, hand surgery, and joint replacement were developed. Research laboratories were established as were a fellowship (with funds provided by Dr. Carl Berg, M1931); an annual visiting professorship; the Arthur Thibodeau Lectureship; and a fully endowed chair. The department achieved recognition for its courses and publications and participated in the education of medical students at all levels; it also went on to develop the state's largest joint replacement program in cooperation with the New England Medical Center, the Boston Veterans Administration Medical Center, and the New England Baptist Hospital.

In 1983 Dr. Banks became dean of the medical school, and in 1984 Dr. Seymour Zimber, who had been vice chairman of the department, became the acting chair. Three years later the present head of the department, Dr. Michael Goldberg, was appointed chairman as well as the first Henry H. Banks Professor. Dr. Goldberg, who graduated from the State University of New York in Brooklyn and trained in orthopedic surgery in the Harvard program, holds leadership positions in the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, the Pediatric Society of North America, and the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine. Under his leadership, the faculty has been reorganized, the research program has been rejuvenated, and the department has maintained affiliations with the New England Medical Center, the Boston V.A. Medical Center, the New England Baptist Hospital, the Newton-Wellesley Hospital, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. The program now provides its residents with didactic courses in pathology, anatomy, and prosthetics and a combined curriculum with residents at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Today the residency is a five-year program with the first year in surgery taken at the New England Medical Center. There is a required research rotation. With limitations on hospital admissions and shorter lengths of stay, there has been a corresponding shift of the educational assignment of residents to outpatient areas in a preceptorship-type arrangement.

Source: COE, 143-45.

Subject terms: School of Medicine Department of Orthopedic Surgery Departments

Although Dr. William Chipman, a professor of surgery, taught students about fractures and dislocations during the school's first few years, orthopedic surgery was first taught by Dr. Charles E. Painter in 1897. At that time the teaching of this discipline consisted of lectures and a clinical exposure for fourth-year students at the Boston Dispensary.

Dr. Painter was appointed the first professor and chair of this division in 1906; he also served as chief of orthopedic surgery at the Carney Hospital. During his tenure, the Massachusetts General Hospital (1913) and the Carney Hospital (1914) began to participate in the program.

Teaching was concentrated at the Massachusetts General Hospital while Dr. Mark Rogers was chairman - from 1925 to 1940 - although students were also exposed to orthopedic patients at both the Boston City and Beth Israel Hospitals. In 1949 St. Elizabeth's Hospital began to provide student teaching; however, after 1952 student teaching was concentrated primarily at the Boston City Hospital, since Drs. Russell Sullivan (1941-1954) and Alexander Aitken (1954-1965), Dr. Rogers' successors, held appointments there.

Dr. Arthur Thibodeau, an expert on the management of spine problems who was chair of the division from 1965 to 1970, introduced an orthopedic residency at both the New England Medical Center and the Boston Veterans Administration Medical Center. He was also responsible for training generations of clinically oriented orthopedic surgeons.

After Dr. Henry H. Banks, M1945, was named chairman in 1970, he initiated a reorganization of the division. During his tenure, a full-time faculty was recruited with a practice plan based at the medical school, and departmental status was given to orthopedic surgery. Space for offices and ambulatory patient care was obtained at the New England Medical Center, where strong divisions of pediatric orthopedics, hand surgery, and joint replacement were developed. Research laboratories were established as were a fellowship (with funds provided by Dr. Carl Berg, M1931); an annual visiting professorship; the Arthur Thibodeau Lectureship; and a fully endowed chair. The department achieved recognition for its courses and publications and participated in the education of medical students at all levels; it also went on to develop the state's largest joint replacement program in cooperation with the New England Medical Center, the Boston Veterans Administration Medical Center, and the New England Baptist Hospital.

In 1983 Dr. Banks became dean of the medical school, and in 1984 Dr. Seymour Zimber, who had been vice chairman of the department, became the acting chair. Three years later the present head of the department, Dr. Michael Goldberg, was appointed chairman as well as the first Henry H. Banks Professor. Dr. Goldberg, who graduated from the State University of New York in Brooklyn and trained in orthopedic surgery in the Harvard program, holds leadership positions in the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, the Pediatric Society of North America, and the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine. Under his leadership, the faculty has been reorganized, the research program has been rejuvenated, and the department has maintained affiliations with the New England Medical Center, the Boston V.A. Medical Center, the New England Baptist Hospital, the Newton-Wellesley Hospital, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. The program now provides its residents with didactic courses in pathology, anatomy, and prosthetics and a combined curriculum with residents at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Today the residency is a five-year program with the first year in surgery taken at the New England Medical Center. There is a required research rotation. With limitations on hospital admissions and shorter lengths of stay, there has been a corresponding shift of the educational assignment of residents to outpatient areas in a preceptorship-type arrangement.

Source: COE, 143-45.

 
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Dame, Lorin Low, 1838-1903
Dana, Charles A., 1881-1975
Dana Laboratory, 1963
Daniel Ounjian Prize in Economics,
Davies, Caroline Stodder, 1864-1939
Davies House, 1894
De Florez Prize in Human Engineering, 1964
de Pacheco, Kaye MacKinnon, ca. 1910-ca. 1985
Dean Hall, 1887-1963
Dean, Oliver, 1783-1871
Dearborn, Heman Allen, 1831-1897
Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, 1893
Department of Anesthesia, 1970
Department of Art and Art History, 1930
Department of Biochemistry, 1893
Department of Chemistry, 1882
Department of Community Health, 1930
Department of Dermatology, 1897
The Department of Economics, 1946
Department of Medicine, 1893
Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology
Department of Neurology, 1893
Department of Neuroscience, 1983
Department of Neurosurgery, 1951
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1893
Department of Ophthamology, 1893
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 1906
Department of Otolaryngology, 1895
Department of Pathology, 1893
Department of Pediatrics, 1930
Department of Pharmacology, 1915
Department of Physics and Astronomy, 1854
Department of Physiology, 1893
Department of Psychiatry, 1928
Department of Radiation Oncology, 1968
Department of Radiology, 1915
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, 1955
Department of Surgery, 1893
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy, 1973
Department of Urology, 1910
Dental Health Sciences Building, 1969
Dewick, Cora Alma (Polk), 1875-1977
Dewick/MacPhie Dining Hall, 1959
Dickson Professorship of English and American History, 1913
Dirlam, Arland A., 1905-1979
Dog Cart, 1900
Dolbear, Amos Emerson, 1837-1910
Donald A. Cowdery Memorial Scholarship, 1946
Dr. Benjamin Andrews Professorship of Surgery, 1987
Dr. Philip E. A. Sheridan Prize, 1977
The Drug Bust, 1970
Dudley, Henry Watson, 1831-1906
Dugger, Edward Jr., 1919-75
Durkee, Frank W., 1861-1939
Durkee, Henrietta Noble Brown, 1871-1946
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The encyclopedia seeks to capture more than 150 years of Tufts' achievements, societal contributions and outstanding alumni and faculty in concise entries. As a source of accurate factual information, the Encyclopedia can be used by anyone interested in the history of Tufts and of the people who have made it the unique institution it is.

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Tufts University--History
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ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00001
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