The Scenery of London

Mitton, G. E.
1905

GREAT MEN

GREAT MEN

Chaucer in Thames StreetBaynard's CastleTower RoyalResidence at AldgateThe King's MewsWestminsterSpenserThe outburst of literature in Elizabeth's timeExecutions on Tower HillOld London Bridge At school in the mansion of The RoseEssex House Friendships with Ralegh and SydneyDeath in King Street , WestminsterMiltonHis ten residences in LondonAt the sign of the Spread EagleSt. Bride's ChurchyardHis austerityScotland Yard Petty FranceHis daughtersClosing scenesDr. JohnsonNo Londoner by birthHis narrow meansWork at Clerkenwell GatewayHis love for Fleet StreetTavernsLearned menExcessive tea-drinkingDickensHardships in early lifeThe blacking factory Great changes in LondonLists of other great men

OLD ESSEX WHARF A few of the clinker-built houses that still remain along the river frontage of Stepney.

To chronicle the names and residences of all the great men connected with London would be a task beyond the powers of any mere mortal, at least if those who have lived in London at any period of their lives were to have a place in the hierarchy. If we took only the statesmen who have governed England, and who by virtue of their office have come to Westminster, their names would furnish forth many a volume. Clearly the area must be more circumscribed.

A lesser ambition might be to enumerate those who are in reality Londoners, men born within the limits of the great City, her own children, and not those adopted sons and daughters she has made her own by right of residence; by this means we should exclude such men as Shakespeare and Carlyle. Yet even so the task would be too great, the burden too heavy to be borne; selection must be made. Therefore, considering that this book is of London first, and of her history and her life, it has been thought advisable to choose men eminent for genius, who are Londoners in the most characteristic sense, whether by birth or adoption, and who have lived in London at intervals of a century more or less, so that we may trace the growth of London in their lives. For this purpose we have selected Chaucer, 1340-1400; Spenser, 1552-1599 ; Milton, 1608-1674; Dr. Johnson, 1708-1784; Dickens, 1812-1870.

 

To chronicle the names and residences of all the great men connected with London would be a task beyond the powers of any mere mortal, at least if those who have lived in London at any period of their lives were to have a place in the hierarchy. If we took only the statesmen who have governed England, and who by virtue of their office have come to , their names would furnish forth many a volume. Clearly the area must be more circumscribed.

A lesser ambition might be to enumerate those who are in reality Londoners, men born within the limits of the great City, her own children, and not those adopted sons and daughters she has made her own by right of residence; by this means we should exclude such men as and Carlyle. Yet even so the task would be too great, the burden too heavy to be borne; selection must be made. Therefore, considering that this book is of London first, and of her history and her life, it has been thought advisable to choose men eminent for genius, who are Londoners in the most characteristic

170

sense, whether by birth or adoption, and who have lived in London at intervals of a century more or less, so that we may trace the growth of London in their lives. For this purpose we have selected , ; , ; , ; , ; , .