The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas
1827

The French Church.

The French Church.

It is a plain structure in the form of an oblong square. The south side, which abuts on the street, is faced with stone, the basement appears to have been built with the materials of the old church; the superstructure is in two stories, made by a string course and consists of a centre with lateral divisions; in the first are three large arched windows, below which were two lintelled entrances, now walled up, a larger entrance having been made beneath and in part occupying the centre window; in the upper story are three circular windows to correspond with those described, but rather smaller, all the lower windows are walled up to the springing of the arches. The angles are rusticated, and the elevation finishes with a cornice, in the centre of which is an elliptical pediment. The east front is concealed from general observation; it is built of brick with stone dressings, and contains a large Venetian window between two arched and two circular ones corresponding with the portion described. The north side of the church has five arched windows with circular ones above; this portion is built of brick and plastered. The west end is built against.

The interior is plain and neat. There are no columns, and it is roofed in one span. The ceiling is horizontal, coved at the sides and pierced with arches above the upper range of windows; in the centre, is a large lantern light of recent construction. A gallery occupies the west, north, and south walls, the front of which is composed of an architrave and denticulated cornice and attic sustained on clustered pillars at the angles, and remarkably slight ones in the intervals with gilt leaved capitals of no regular order ; in the western branch of the gallery is an organ. The altar has a plain screen painted with drapery held back by cherubim and inscribed with the decalogue in French; it partly conceals the Venetian window in the centre of the wall. The pulpit and desks are situated in the front of the rails of the altar, the former is poligonal and has a sounding board and canopy of the same form, it is constructed of oak and richly carved; in a pew beneath the pulpit is a small font.

In this ward are several public offices, and halls of companies; the principal object of interest is the extensive pile of buildings known as

It is a plain structure in the form of an oblong square. The south side, which abuts on the street, is faced with stone, the basement appears to have been built with the materials of the old church; the superstructure is in stories, made by a string course and consists of a centre with lateral divisions; in the are large arched windows, below which were lintelled entrances, now walled up, a larger entrance having been made beneath and in part occupying the centre window; in the upper story are circular windows to correspond with those described, but rather smaller, all the lower windows are walled up to the springing of the arches. The angles are rusticated, and the elevation finishes with a cornice, in the centre of which is an elliptical pediment. The east front is concealed from general observation; it is built of brick with stone dressings, and contains a large Venetian window between arched and circular ones corresponding with the portion described. The north side of the church has arched windows with circular ones above; this portion is built of brick and plastered. The west end is built against.

The interior is plain and neat. There are no columns, and it is roofed in span. The ceiling is horizontal, coved at the sides and pierced with arches above the upper range of windows; in the centre, is a large lantern light of recent construction. A gallery occupies the west, north, and south walls, the front of which is composed of an architrave and denticulated cornice and attic sustained on clustered pillars at the angles, and remarkably slight ones in the intervals with gilt leaved capitals of no regular order ; in the western branch of the gallery is an organ. The altar has a plain screen painted with drapery held back by cherubim and inscribed with the decalogue in French; it partly conceals the Venetian window in the centre of the wall. The pulpit and desks are situated in the front of the rails of the altar, the former is poligonal and has a sounding board and canopy of the same form, it is constructed of oak and richly carved; in a pew beneath the pulpit is a small font.

In this ward are several public offices, and halls of companies; the principal object of interest is the extensive pile of buildings known as

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
collapseCHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
collapseCHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
collapseCHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
collapseCHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
collapseCHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
collapseCHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
collapseCHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44306
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00068
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
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