The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas
1827

Newgate.

Newgate.

Newgate

This gate was situated at the distance of 1,037 feet south-west from the spot where Aldersgate did stand; and it is the opinion of most of our antiquarians, that it obtained its name from being erected in the reign of Henry I. several hundred years after the four original gates of the city.

Howel dissents from this opinion, and asserts that it was only repaired in the above mentioned reign, and that it was anciently denominated Chamberlain gate: but if this be true, it is very extraordinary that this gate is not once mentioned before the conquest.

It appears, however, from ancient records, that it was called Newgate, and was a common jail for felons taken in the city of London, or the county of Middlesex, as early as the year 1218; and that so lately as the year 1457, Newgate, and not the Tower, was the prison for the nobility and great officers of state. Newgate, being much damaged by the fire of London in 1666 was repaired in the year 1672.

The west side of this gate was adorned with three ranges of Tuscan pilasters with their entablatures, and in the intercolumniations were four niches, in one of which was a figure representing Liberty, having the word Libertas inscribed on her cap; and at her feet a cat, in allusion to the story of sir Richard Whittington.

The east side of the gate was likewise adorned with a range of pilasters, and in three niches the figures of Justice, Mercy, and Truth.

 

This gate was situated at the distance of feet south-west from the spot where Aldersgate did stand; and it is the opinion of most of our antiquarians, that it obtained its name from being erected

595

in the reign of Henry I. several years after the original gates of the city.

Howel dissents from this opinion, and asserts that it was only repaired in the above mentioned reign, and that it was anciently denominated Chamberlain gate: but if this be true, it is very extraordinary that this gate is not once mentioned before the conquest.

It appears, however, from ancient records, that it was called Newgate, and was a common jail for felons taken in the city of London, or the county of Middlesex, as early as the year ; and that so lately as the year , Newgate, and not the Tower, was the prison for the nobility and great officers of state. Newgate, being much damaged by the fire of London in was repaired in the year .

The west side of this gate was adorned with ranges of Tuscan pilasters with their entablatures, and in the intercolumniations were niches, in of which was a figure representing Liberty, having the word inscribed on her cap; and at her feet a cat, in allusion to the story of sir Richard Whittington.

The east side of the gate was likewise adorned with a range of pilasters, and in niches the figures of Justice, Mercy, and Truth.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
collapseCHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
collapseCHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
collapseCHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
collapseCHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
collapseCHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
collapseCHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
collapseCHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44306
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00068
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
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