The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas
1827

House or Convent of Grey Friars or Friars Minors.

House or Convent of Grey Friars or Friars Minors.

The first of this order of friars in England, nine in number, arrived at Dover, out of Italy, in the year 1224, the eighth year of the reign of king Henry III. being of the order of the Franciscans, or friars minors: five of them, being priests, remained at Canterbury; the other four, being laymen, came to London, and were lodged at the Preaching-friars in Holborn for the space of fifteen days: and then they hired a house on Cornhill of John Trevers, one of the sheriffs of London. They built there little cells, wherein they inhabited: but, shortly after, the devotion of the citizens towards them, and the number of the friars so increased, that they were by the citizens removed to a place in St. Nicholas Shambles, which John Ewin, mercer, purchasing a void piece of ground, appropriated unto the commonalty, to the use of these said friars; and himself became a lay-brother amongst them about the year 1225.

Divers citizens seemed herein to join with the said John Ewin, mid erected there very beautiful buildings. William Joyner, lord mayor of London, in the year 1239, built the choir, which cost him 200l. sterling. Henry Walleis, who was likewise lord mayor of London, built the body of the church, which afterwards was pulled down, and made as now it is. Walter potter, alderman, built the chapter-house; and gave divers vessels of brass for the kitchen service: building places also for sick persons, besides other offices. Thomas Felcham built the vestry-house. Gregory Rokesley, lord mayor of London, built their dorters and chambers, and gave beds to them. Bartholomew of the Castel made the refectory. Peter de Helyland built the infirmary, and divers places for diseased persons. Bevis Bond, king at arms, the study. Queen Margaret, second wife to Edward I. began the choir of their new church in the year 1306; to the building whereof, in her life-time, she gave 2,000 marks, and 100 marks by her testament. John Britaine, earl of Richmond, built the body of the church to the charges of 300l. and gave many rich jewels and ornaments to be used in the same. Mary, countess of Pembroke, gave 70l Gilbert de Clare, earl of Gloucester, bestowed twenty great beams out of his forest of Tunbridge, and 20l. sterling. Lady Eleanor le Spencer, lady Elizabeth de Brugh, sister to Gilbert de Clare, gave sums of money; and so did divers citizens, as Arnold de Tollnea, 100l. Robert, baron Lisle, who became a friar there, gave 300l. Bartholomew de Almaine, gave 50l. Also queen Philippe, wife to Edward III. gave 62l. Isabel, queen-mother to Edward III. gave 70l. and so the work was done within the space of 21 years, 1327.

This church, thus furnished with windows, made at the charges of divers persons, the lady Margaret Seagrave, countess of Norfolk, bore the charges of making the stalls in the choir, to the value of 350 marks, about the year 1380. Richard Whittington, in the year 1429, founded the library, which was in length one hundred and twenty-nine feet, and in breadth thirty-one, all ceiled with wainscot, having twenty-eight desks, and eight double settles of wainscot: which, in the year following, was altogether finished in building; and within three years after furnished with books, to the charges of 556l. 10s. whereof Richard Whitington bare 400l.; the rest was borne by Dr. Thomas Winchelsea, a friar there: and for the writing out of D. Nicholas de Lira's works, in two volumes, to be chained there, 100 marks, &c.

The ceiling of the choir, at divers men's charges, 200 marks, and the painting at 50 marks: their conduit-head and watercourse were given them by William Taylor, taylor to Henry III. &c.

This noble church contained, in length, three hundred feet; in breadth eighty-nine feet; and in height, from the ground to the roof, sixty-four feet two inches, &c. It was consecrated 1325; and, at the general suppression, was valued at 32l. 19s.; surrendered the 12th of November, 1538, the 30th of Henry VIII. the ornaments and goods being taken to the king's use. The church was shut up for a time, and used as a store-house for goods, taken as prizes from the French: but, in the year 1546, on the 3rd of January, it was again set open; on which day preached at Paul's Cross the bishop of Rochester, where he declared the king's gift thereof to the city for the relieving the poor; which gift was, by patent of St. Bartholomew's Spital in Smithfield, valued at 305l. 6s. 7d. and surrendered to the king, of the said church of the Grey-friars, and of two parish churches, the one of St. Nicholas in the Shambles, and the other of St. Ewin's in Newgate-market, which were to be made one parish church in the said friars church : and in lands he gave, for the maintenance of the said church, with divine service, reparations, &c. 500 marks a year for ever.

The seal of this monastery is very elegant both in design and execution. It is oval, with a diapered back ground; in the upper portion are two religious persons (one holding a cross) bearing a triangular shrine, within which is St. Peter with his sword, seated. The tabernacle is ornamented with trefoil canopies, pinnacles, &c. Between the two figures in base is a tree flowering, with birds sitting thereon. The legend is SIGILLVM CONVENTVS FRATRVM MINORVE LONDONIAR.Common seal. Indent. of foundation Hen. vii. chapel in the Chapter Ho. Westminster.

The 13th of January, the 38th of Henry VIII. an agreement was made betwixt the king, the mayor, and commonalty of London, dated the 27th of December; by which the said Grey-friars church, with all the edifices and ground, the fratry, the library, the dorter, and the chapter-house, the great cloister and the lesser; tenements, gardens, and vacant grounds; lead, stone, iron, &c.; the hospital of St. Bartholomew in West-Smithfield, with the church of the same; the lead, bells, and ornaments of the same hospital, with all the messuages, tenements, and appurtenances; the parishes of St. Nicholas and of St. Ewin's, and so much of St. Sepulchre's parish as is within the gate, called Newgate, were made one parish church in the Grey-friars church, and called Christ's church, founded by king Henry VIII.

The vicar of Christ's church was to have 26l. 13s. 4d. a year: the vicar of St. Bartholomew's, 13l. 6s. 8d. The visitor of Newgate, being a priest, 10l. and the other five priests in Christ's church, ministering the sacraments and sacramentals, to have 8l. a piece: two clerks 6l. each: a sexton 4l. Moreover, he gave to them the hospital of Bethlehem, with the laver of brass in the cloister, by estimation eighteen feet in length; and the watercourse of lead, to the Friar-house belonging, containing by estimation, in length, eighteen acres.

In this monastery, there was a stinking dungeon, which was used in queen Mary's time to confine vagabonds and idle persons. The porter of this dungeon was one Ninian. Here Thomas Green, servant to John Wayland, printer, was brought, and, after some time, whipped grievously, having the correction of thieves and vagabonds, for a book called Antichrist, that he had assisted at the printing of.

The defaced monuments in this church were these: First, in the choir before the altar, the monument of the lady Margaret, daughter to Philip king of France, and wife to Edward I. foundress of this new church, 1317. In the midst of a tomb of alabaster, queen Isabel, wife to Edward II. daughter to Philip le Bell, king of France, 1358. And under her breast was the heart of her husband. Joan of the Tower, queen of Scots, wife to Edward Bruce, daughter to Edward II. who died in Hertford castle, and was buried by Isabel, her mother, 1632. In the lamp laid sir William Fitzwarren, baron, and Isabel his wife, some time queen of the Isle of Man. At the head of queen Margaret laid Isabel, first daughter to Edward III. wedded to the lord Couse of France, afterwards created earl of Bedford. Eleanor, wife to John, duke of Brittany. In an arch in the wall, before the end of the altar, laid Beatrix, duchess of Brittany, daughter to Henry III. And Eleanor, duchess of Buckingham, 1530. This lady bequeathed her heart to be buried in the Grey-friars church in London, and her body in the White-friars church in Bristol. Sir Robert Lisle, baron; the lady Lisle, and Margaret de Rivers, countess of Devon, all under one stone. The heart of Peter Mountford laid at the head of the aforesaid countess; and the heart of the lady Jane de Serre, wife of Guy de Salines. At the head of Robert Lisle laid the heart of the lady Isabel de Averne. Joane de Fenys, and Isabel her sister.

At the right side, the lady Enforme de Pysans. The lady Beatrix Brabazon laid by her. Gregory Rokysle, mayor, 1282, by her. Roger Mortimer, earl of March, beheaded in 1329. Peter, bishop of Carbon in Hungary, 1331. Sir John Devereux, knt. 1385.

In that part of the church, before the entering of the choir, were interred, John Claron, knt. of France. Sir Edmund Burnel at his right hand. John Hastings, earl of Pembroke, 1389. Slain at a tournament. Margaret, daughter of Thomas Brotherton, earl-marshal: she was duchess of Norfolk, and countess-marshall, and lady Segrave, 1389. Joan, queen of Scotland. Richard Havering, knt. 1388. Robert Tresilian, knt. chief justice, 1308. Geoffry Lucy, son to Geoffry Lucy. John Aubry, son to John, mayor of Norwich, 1368. John Philpot, knt. mayor of London; and the lady Jane Stamford, his wife, 1384. John, duke of Bourbon and Angue, earl of Claremond, Mountpencier, and baron Beangen, who was taken prisoner at Agincourt, kept prisoner eighteen years, and deceased in 1433. He laid at the side of the aforesaid queen Joan. Sir Robert Chalons, knt. 1439. John Chalons, his son. In the east wing of the choir. Margery , gentlewoman, with queen Isabel. And on her right hand John Romesey, her son. Margaret, daughter to sir John Philpot, first married to T. Santlor, esq. and afterwards to John Neyland, esq. Sir Nicholas Brembar, mayor of London, buried 1386. Elizabeth Nevil, wife to John, son and heir to Ralph, earl of Westmoreland, and mother to Ralph, earl of Westmoreland, and daughter to Thomas Holland, earl of Kent, 1423. Edward Burnel, son to the lord Bumel.

In Allhallows chapel. James Fines, lord Say, 1450; and Eleanor, his wife, 1452. John Smith, bishop of Landaffe, 1478. John, baron Hilton. John, baron Clinton. Richard Hastings, knt. lord of Willoughby and Wells. He bequeathed his body to lie in the Grey-friars, London, in the vestry chapel there; and gave 20l. to have a tomb: his will bore date March the 18th, anno 1501. Jane Hastings, widow, late wife of Richard Hastings, lord Willoughby, by her will, bearing date March 19, 1504, bequeathed her body to be buried in the Friars minors church within Newgate, London, in the vault there purposely made for her said husband and her. She willed that six priests should pray for her, &c. Whereof one priest shall sing for ever in the monastery of Mountgrace, another at the chantry founded by her father, in his parish church of North-Allerton. Which will was proved 1505. Thomas Burder, esq. beheaded in 1477. John Viand, by him. Lord Lisle. Robert Lisle, son and heir to the lord Lisle. Sir John Lovetoht, knt. And at his feet dame Margaret, his wife. Walter Bever.

In our Lady's chapel. John Gisors, of London, knt. and lord mayor. Humphry Stafford, esq. of Worcestershire, 1486. Robert Bartram, baron of Rothale. Sir Ralph Barons, knt. William Apleton, knt. Reynold de Cambrey, knt. Thomas Beaumont, son and heir to Henry lord Beaumont. Adam de Howton, knt. 1417. Bartholomew Caster, knt. of London. Reinfrede Arundel, knt. 1468. Thomas Covil, esq. 1422. Dame Yde Seagrave, wife of Hugh Peache. Alys Kingeston, daughter of the lord John St. John. Sir James Fenys, lord Say in Gwynes. His wife, daughter of Crond Dame Petronyl, wife of sir Hugh Halsman. Lady Huse, her sister, wife of sir Henry Huse, of Sussex, Dame Elizabeth Morley. Sir Persyval Bourbon, bastard of Bourbon. Dame Isabel, wife of Roger Chanoyes, baron. Dame Jane Newmarsh. Thomas Glocester, and Anne, his wife. Margaret Othal, wife of sir William Othal, and daughter of the lord Willoughby. Sir John Boteler, knt.

In the Apostles chapel. Walter Blunt, knight of the garter, and lord Mountjoy, treasurer of England, son and heir to T. Blunt, knt. treasurer of Normandy, 1474. This noble person's last will bore date April the 8th, 1474; wherein it was his desire to be buried in the Grey-friars, London, according to the advice of his dear and well-beloved lady and wife Anne, duchess of Bucks. He willed that every parish church within the hundred of Apultree, wherein he was bred, should have a vestment, after the discretion of his executors. Edward Blunt, lord Mountjoy, his son and heir by his side, 1475. Alice Blunt, lady Mountjoy, sometime wife to William Browne, mayor of London; and daughter to H. Kebel, mayor, 1521. William Blunt, knt. lord Mountjoy, by his will, dated Oct. 13, 1534, willed, if he died in London, to be buried in the Grey-friars, in the chapel where his grandfather and grandmother, his father, and his wife dame Alice, with other of his kindred, lay; which Alice was daughter of Henry Keble, that lay buried in Aldermary church in London, and was a special benefactor to the building of the same, to the value of 2,000l. and above; and had no stone over him. This he took notice of in his said will, and willed [a stone to be provided to lay over him. Anne Blunt, daughter to John Blunt, knt. lord Mountoy, 1480. Sir Allen Cheiny, knt. and sir Tho. Greene, knt. William Blunt, esq. son and heir to Walter Blunt; and father to Edward, lord Mountjoy. James Blunt, knt. son to Walter Blunt, captain of Gwynes, 1494. Elizabeth Blunt, wife to Robert Curson, knt. 1494. Bartholomew Burwash, and John Burwash, his son. John Blunt, lord Mountjoy, captain of Gwynes and Hames, 1485. Alan Buxhall, of London. Dame Barga de Vaugh by his right hand. And by her dame Elizabeth Burwash, wife to sir Bartholomew. By him dame Isabel Gillisborough. Lord Strange; and by him the countess. Sir James Blunt, and Elizabeth his wife. Joan Samford, and John her son. Thomas Bradbury. Nicholas Marys. Thurstan Hatfield. Elizabeth Boulen, daughter of Thomas Blunt, esq. John Dinham, baron, some time treasurer of England, knight of the garter, 150l. John Blunt, knt. 1531. Rowland Blunt, esq. 1509 Robert Bradbury, 1489. Nicholas Clifton, knt. Two sons of Alleyne, lord Cheiny; and John, son and heir to the same lord Alleyne Cheiny, knt. John Robsart, knight of the garter, 1450. Alleyne Cheiny, knt. Thomas Malory, knt. 1470. Thomas Yonge, a justice of the bench, 1476. John Baldwin, fellow of Gray's-Inn, and common serjeant of London, 1469. Walter Wrottesley, knt. of Warwickshire, 1473. Stephen Jennings, merchant-taylor, mayor, 1523. Thomas a Par, and John Wiltwater, slain at Barnet, 1471. Nicholas Poynes, esq. 1512. Robert Elkenton, knt. 1460. John Water, York Herald, 1520. John Moore, Norroy king at arms, 1491. John Hopton knt. 1489. Between the choir and altar. Ralph Spiganel, knt. John Moyle, gent. of Gray's-Inn, 1495 William Huddy, knt. 150l.

By the door underneath the rood. John Cobham, a baron of Kent. Sir John Mortaine, knt. John Deyncourt, knt. at the end of the second altar, and Margaret his wife. John Norbery, esq. high treasurer of England, in a tomb of alabaster. Henry Norbery, esq. his son. John Southlee, knt. Thomas Sackvile. Thomas Lucy, knt. 1525. Robert de la Rivar, son to Mauricius de la Rivar, lord of Tormerton, 1457. John Malmayns, esq. and Thomas Malmayns, knt. Nicholas Malmayns, knt. and dame Alice Malmayns. Hugh Acton, Taylor, 1530. Hugh Parsal, knt. 1490. Sir Alexander Kirketon, knt.

In the body of the church. William Paulet, esq. of Somersetshire, 1482. John Moyle, gent. 1530. Peter Champion, esq. 1511. John Hart, gent. 1449. Alice, lady Hungerford, hanged at Tyburn for murdering her husband, 1523. Edward Hall, of Gray's-inn, 1470. Richard Churchyard, gent. fellow of Gray's-inn, 1498. John Bramre, gent. of Gray's-inn, 1498. John Mortimer, knt. beheaded, 1423. Henry Frowike, alderman. Reynold Frowike. Philip Pats, 1518. William Porter, serjeant at arms, 1515. Thomas Grantham, gent. 1511. Edmund Rothely, gent. 1470. Henry Roston, gent. of Gray's-inn, 1485. Nicholas Montgomery, gent. son to John Montgomery, of Northamptonshire, 1458. Sir Bartholomew Enefield, knt. Sir Barnard St. Peter, knt. Sir Ralph Sandwiche, knt. custos of London. Sir Andrew Sakeville, knt. John Treszawall, gentleman, and taylor of London, 1520.

Under the bell-house and ambulatory. The lady Tephina, nurse to queen Isabel Simon Guydon, esq. of France William Galys, esq. with him his son Robert by them, Alice, wife of Geffrey Tabelletor John Merwer sir John Ratmestre, knt. and friar Ralph Sprignel, knt. William Hilton, esq.; Roger Bainon, (Bainton perhaps) and his daughter, Isabel Luther; and by him laid the wife of Nicholas Fulham Thomas Kenyngham Elizabeth de la Penne, daughter of William Stafford, knt. Henry Werney, esq., and many of the Bardolfs of Florence.

Before the altar, within the walls. Before the common altar, dame Agnes Matrovers; by her, Lore Clakus.

Before the midst of the second altar,Margaret Asselky. Dame--, wife of Wlliam de Monte Canisio, (i. e. Monchensy,) baron, with her mother Idoneah, wedded to sir Hugh de Monte, knt. John Sudley, knt. under the west wall. Sir John Dewrose, (Devereaux, perhaps) in the highest side of the common altar. Lady Beaumont, daughter of the earl of Oxenford. Petronilla, wife of John Norbery, esq.; Nicholas Ulsk; and, at his right hand. Richard Gest, esq.

In the chapter house. The lady Imayne, of Huntengfelde. In the body of the church, between the pillars. William English; sir Henry Enefeld, by the right side of sir Bartholomew Enefeld.

In the west wing of the church.

Thomas, son of Thomas Lewkener; Simon Garreys, esq.; sir William Pickworth, knt. Sir Richard Punchardon, knt.; sir William Maynard; Walter Huddon, doctor, &c.

In this church of the Grey-friars there were nine tombs of alabaster and marble, environed with pallisadoes of iron, in the choir; and one tomb in the body of the church, also coped with iron; all pulled down, besides one hundred and forty gravestones of marble, all sold for fifty pounds, or thereabouts, by sir Martin Bowes, goldsmith, and alderman of London! Ministers Accounts, 32 Henry VIII. Lands and possessions of the Friars Minors in the city of London. £s.d. Lands and tenements within the close of the said priory22174 Site of the house: not answered for because the cloisters and other buildings there were committed by the commissioners at the dissolution to John Wiseman, gent., to be kept for the use of the king But for lands there3134 Obits and anniversaries, 4l., from the society of lez taylors, London, for the anniversary of sir Stephen Gennynnes, pann. and 3l. 10s. of the society of clothworkers, (pannar, London) for the anniversary of Hugh Acton7100 For 3l. 6s. 8d. of the abbot of Westminster, for the anniversary of the most noble prince Henry VII.: nothing, because it is extinguished

The of this order of friars in England, in number, arrived at Dover, out of Italy, in the year , the year of the reign of king Henry III. being of the order of the Franciscans, or friars minors: of them, being priests, remained at Canterbury; the other , being laymen, came to London, and were lodged at the Preaching-friars in for the space of days: and then they hired a house on of John Trevers, of the sheriffs of London. They built there little cells, wherein they inhabited: but, shortly after, the devotion of the citizens towards them, and the number of the friars so increased, that they were by the citizens removed to a place in St. Nicholas Shambles, which John Ewin, mercer, purchasing a void piece of ground, appropriated unto the commonalty, to the use of these said friars; and himself became a lay-brother amongst them about the year .

Divers citizens seemed herein to join with the said John Ewin, mid erected there very beautiful buildings.

This church, thus furnished with windows, made at the charges of divers persons, the lady Margaret Seagrave, countess of Norfolk, bore the charges of making the stalls in the choir, to the value of , about the year . Richard Whittington, in the year , founded the library, which was in length feet, and in breadth , all ceiled with wainscot, having desks, and double settles of wainscot: which, in the year following, was altogether finished in building; and within years after furnished with books, to the charges of whereof Richard Whitington bare ; the rest was borne by Dr. Thomas Winchelsea, a friar there: and for the writing out of D. Nicholas de Lira's works, in volumes, to be chained there, , &c.

The ceiling of the choir, at divers men's charges, , and the painting at : their conduit-head and watercourse were given them by William Taylor, taylor to Henry III. &c.

This noble church contained, in length, feet; in breadth feet; and in height, from the ground to the roof, feet inches, &c. It was consecrated ; and, at the general suppression, was valued at ; surrendered the , the of Henry VIII. the ornaments

549

and goods being taken to the king's use. The church was shut up for a time, and used as a store-house for goods, taken as prizes from the French: but, in the year , on the , it was again set open; on which day preached at Paul's Cross the bishop of Rochester, where he declared the king's gift thereof to the city for the relieving the poor; which gift was, by patent of St. Bartholomew's Spital in , valued at and surrendered to the king, of the said church of the Grey-friars, and of parish churches, the of St. Nicholas in the Shambles, and the other of St. Ewin's in Newgate-market, which were to be made parish church in the said friars church : and in lands he gave, for the maintenance of the said church, with divine service, reparations, &c. a year for ever.

The seal of this monastery is very elegant both in design and execution. It is oval, with a diapered back ground; in the upper portion are religious persons ( holding a cross) bearing a triangular shrine, within which is St. Peter with his sword, seated. The tabernacle is ornamented with trefoil canopies, pinnacles, &c. Between the figures in base is a tree flowering, with birds sitting thereon. The legend is .

The , the of Henry VIII. an agreement was made betwixt the king, the mayor, and commonalty of London, dated the ; by which the said Grey-friars church, with all the edifices and ground, the fratry, the library, the dorter, and the chapter-house, the great cloister and the lesser; tenements, gardens, and vacant grounds; lead, stone, iron, &c.; the hospital of St. Bartholomew in West-Smithfield, with the church of the same; the lead, bells, and ornaments of the same hospital, with all the messuages, tenements, and appurtenances; the parishes of St. Nicholas and of St. Ewin's, and so much of St. Sepulchre's parish as is within the gate, called Newgate, were made parish church in the Grey-friars church, and called Christ's church, founded by king Henry VIII.

The vicar of Christ's church was to have a year: the vicar of St. Bartholomew's, The visitor of Newgate, being a priest, and the other priests in Christ's church, ministering the sacraments and sacramentals, to have a piece: clerks each: a sexton Moreover, he gave to them the hospital of Bethlehem, with the laver of brass in the cloister, by estimation eighteen feet in length; and the watercourse of lead, to the Friar-house belonging, containing by estimation, in length, eighteen acres.

In this monastery, there was a

stinking dungeon,

which was used in queen Mary's time to confine vagabonds and idle persons. The porter of this dungeon was Ninian. Here Thomas Green,

550

servant to John Wayland, printer, was brought, and, after some time,

whipped grievously, having the correction of thieves and vagabonds, for a book called Antichrist, that he had assisted at the printing of.

The defaced monuments in this church were these:

At the right side, the lady Enforme de Pysans.

In that part of the church, before the entering of the choir, were interred, In the east wing of the choir.

In Allhallows chapel.

552

 

In our Lady's chapel.

In the Apostles chapel.

By the door underneath the rood.

In the body of the church.

Under the bell-house and ambulatory.

555

 

Before the altar, within the walls.

Before the midst of the altar,

In the chapter house. In the body of the church, between the pillars.

In the west wing of the church.

In this church of the Grey-friars there were tombs of alabaster and marble, environed with pallisadoes of iron, in the choir; and tomb in the body of the church, also coped with iron; all pulled down, besides gravestones of marble, all sold for , or thereabouts, by sir Martin Bowes, goldsmith, and alderman of London!

Ministers Accounts,32Henry VIII. Lands and possessions of the Friars Minors in the city of London.
 £s.d.
Lands and tenements within the close of the said priory22174
Site of the house: not answered for because the cloisters and other buildings there were committed by the commissioners at the dissolution to John Wiseman, gent., to be kept for the use of the king 
But for lands there3134
Obits and anniversaries, 4l., from the society of lez taylors, London, for the anniversary of sir
Stephen Gennynnes, pann. and 3l. 10s. of the society of clothworkers, (pannar, London) for the anniversary of Hugh Acton7100

556

For

3l. 6s. 8d.

of the abbot of

Westminster

, for the anniversary of the most noble prince Henry VII.: nothing, because it is extinguished

 
 
Footnotes:

[] Common seal. Indent. of foundation Hen. vii. chapel in the Chapter Ho. Westminster.

View all images in this book
 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
collapseCHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
collapseCHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
collapseCHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
collapseCHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
collapseCHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
collapseCHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
collapseCHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44306
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00068
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
Usage: Detailed Rights