The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas
1827

Lamb's Conduit, Snow Hill.

Lamb's Conduit, Snow Hill.

Lamb's Conduit, Snow Hill

This conduit formerly occupied the spot on which two, still more ancient stood. The first was erected in 1498, the second by Mr. William Lamb, a gentleman of the chapel to Henry VIII.

This building had four equal sides, and was ornamented with Corinthian pillars, pediments, and the arms of the city; the whole surmounted by a pyramid, on which was a lamb, a rebus on the name of Lamb, from whose conduit in Red Lion-street, the water came. On a tablet in front was the following inscription :-- Rebuilt in the year 1677. Sir Thos. Davis, knt. Lord Mayor.

This conduit ran with wine on the anniversary of the coronation of George I. 1727, which was procured by the subscription of several loyal inhabitants. At the same time, the sides in the evening exhibited the following distich: Since love and peace do promise happy days, Fame, clap thy wings, and sound great George's praise. represented by large letters cut through pasteboard, behind which red transparent paper and candles were placed. An order was issued in the ensuing year for the destruction of all the city conduits; probably to oblige the public to adopt the New River water, then coming into general use.

Opposite St. Sepulchre's church is Angel-court, at the upper end of which is a handsome old house, formerly the Farthing Office. It was afterwards occupied by the Hand-in-hand fire office, and is now the residence of Mr. Hoby.

Between Snow-hill and Ludgate-hill, runs the street called the Old Bailey, which many of our antiquaries are of opinion is a corruption of Bale-hill, an eminence whereon was situated the Bale, or Bailiff's-house, wherein he held a court for the trial of malefactors; and this opinion seems to be corroborated by such a court having been held here for many centuries, in which there is a place of security, where the sheriffs keeps their prisoners during the session, which still retains the name of the Bale-dock.

On the east side of the Old Bailey, and contiguous to the place where the New-gate of the city formerly stood, is the

 

This conduit formerly occupied the spot on which , still more ancient stood. The was erected in , the by Mr. William Lamb, a gentleman of the chapel to Henry VIII.

This building had equal sides, and was ornamented with Corinthian pillars, pediments, and the arms of the city; the whole surmounted by a pyramid, on which was a lamb, a rebus on the name of Lamb, from whose conduit in , the water came. On a tablet in front was the following inscription :--

Rebuilt in the year

1677

.

Sir Thos. Davis, knt. Lord Mayor.

This conduit ran with wine on the anniversary of the coronation of George I. , which was procured by the subscription of several loyal inhabitants. At the same time, the sides in the evening exhibited the following distich:

Since love and peace do promise happy days,

Fame, clap thy wings, and sound great George's praise.

660

represented by large letters cut through pasteboard, behind which red transparent paper and candles were placed. An order was issued in the ensuing year for the destruction of all the city conduits; probably to oblige the public to adopt the water, then coming into general use.

Opposite St. Sepulchre's church is Angel-court, at the upper end of which is a handsome old house, formerly the Farthing Office. It was afterwards occupied by the Hand-in-hand fire office, and is now the residence of Mr. Hoby.

Between and , runs the street called the , which many of our antiquaries are of opinion is a corruption of Bale-hill, an eminence whereon was situated the Bale, or Bailiff's-house, wherein he held a court for the trial of malefactors; and this opinion seems to be corroborated by such a court having been held here for many centuries, in which there is a place of security, where the sheriffs keeps their prisoners during the session, which still retains the name of the Bale-dock.

On the east side of the , and contiguous to the place where the New-gate of the city formerly stood, is the

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
collapseCHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
collapseCHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
collapseCHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
collapseCHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
collapseCHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
collapseCHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
collapseCHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44306
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00068
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
Usage: Detailed Rights