The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas
1827

Bangor House.

Bangor House.

Bangor House

Nearly opposite, in Bangor-court, were, till the commencement of the year 1828, the remains of the city mansion of the bishops of Bangor, the east end of which had some appearance of having been formerly used as a chapel. In the window, in this end, was a coat of arms, in stained glass, with the name of Fletwood. On the south side of the building was an ancient doorway, ornamented with military trophies. The reversion of this messuage, with a quantity of waste land belonging to it, measuring 168 feet in length, from north to south, and 164 feet in breadth, from east to west, was sold in the year 1647, by the trustees for the sale of bishops' lands, to John Barkstead, knt. who purchased it for the purpose of building on the vacant ground, as appears by an act of parliament passed in 1656, for restraining new buildings in and about the suburbs of London, in which there is a special proviso to enable him to build thereon, in consideration of his having given a greater sum for the purchase of it, on that account, than he would otherwise have done. The last bishop of Bangor, who appears to have resided here, was bishop Dolben, who having been formerly vicar of Hackney, contributed thirty pounds for repairing the causeway leading from Clapton and Hackney, to Shoreditch, of which he informed the inhabitants of these villages, by a letter dated from Bangor-house, in Shoe-lane, the 11th November, 1633.

Nearly adjoining the church of St. Andrew, on the west side, is the vestry and inquest room of the parish. It is a modern brick edifice, erected in 1824; in the inquest room is one of the handsomest and most highly decorated chimney pieces in the metropolis In the centre are the royal arms of James I. and on each side are niches with statues of St. Peter and St. Andrew; beneath each figure are scriptural representations in alto relievo. The niches are ornamented with fluted Corinthian columns supporting pediments. The basement of this elegant piece of carving is supported by terminal statues. On each side are obelisks, to which are affixed shields of arms, viz. the city and ar. a cross moline gu.

 

Nearly opposite, in Bangor-court, were, till the commencement

680

of the year , the remains of the city mansion of the bishops of Bangor, the east end of which had some appearance of having been formerly used as a chapel. In the window, in this end, was a coat of arms, in stained glass, with the name of Fletwood. On the south side of the building was an ancient doorway, ornamented with military trophies. The reversion of this messuage, with a quantity of waste land belonging to it, measuring feet in length, from north to south, and feet in breadth, from east to west, was sold in the year , by the trustees for the sale of bishops' lands, to John Barkstead, knt. who purchased it for the purpose of building on the vacant ground, as appears by an act of parliament passed in , for restraining new buildings in and about the suburbs of London, in which there is a special proviso to enable him to build thereon, in consideration of his having given a greater sum for the purchase of it, on that account, than he would otherwise have done. The last bishop of Bangor, who appears to have resided here, was bishop Dolben, who having been formerly vicar of Hackney, contributed for repairing the causeway leading from Clapton and Hackney, to , of which he informed the inhabitants of these villages, by a letter dated from Bangor-house, in , the .

Nearly adjoining the church of St. Andrew, on the west side, is the vestry and inquest room of the parish. It is a modern brick edifice, erected in ; in the inquest room is of the handsomest and most highly decorated chimney pieces in the metropolis In the centre are the royal arms of James I. and on each side are niches with statues of St. Peter and St. Andrew; beneath each figure are scriptural representations in alto relievo. The niches are ornamented with fluted Corinthian columns supporting pediments. The basement of this elegant piece of carving is supported by terminal statues. On each side are obelisks, to which are affixed shields of arms, viz. the city and ar. a cross moline gu.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
collapseCHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
collapseCHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
collapseCHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
collapseCHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
collapseCHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
collapseCHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
collapseCHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44306
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00068
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
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