The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas
1827

Corn Exchange.

Corn Exchange.

The business of a corn-broker is one of modern growth and doubtful utility. Formerly the farmers of Kent and Essex used to send their grain up the river, and attend a sort of market at Bear Quay; but about the middle of the last century, when grain was cheap, the farmers often returned home without selling their grain. Those from Essex chiefly used the Bull inn, Whitechapel; and the landlord, who was of an enterprising spirit, proposed that the samples, with the prices, should be left with him, in order that he might try to dispose of the grain in their absence. This man, whose name was Johnson, and who was originally the boots of the inn, soon got so much business in this way, that he opened an office at Bear Quay as a corn factor, and amassed a fortune.

The business of corn factors soon increased so much, that they erected a market in Mark-lane, which is called the Corn Exchange. The building, with which two coffee-houses are connected, is of the Doric order; and the quadrangle, where the samples of grain are exhibited, is capacious. The brokers at first wished to render the Corn Exchange a private market; but on application to parliament it was thrown open. Opposite to this market is a much neater though smaller structure, called The New Exchange for Corn and Seed.

Adjoining the old Corn Exchange is an elegant building called the

The business of a corn-broker is of modern growth and doubtful utility. Formerly the farmers of Kent and Essex used to send their grain up the river, and attend a sort of market at Bear Quay; but about the middle of the last century, when grain was cheap, the farmers often returned home without selling their grain. Those from Essex chiefly used the Bull inn, Whitechapel; and the landlord, who was of an enterprising spirit, proposed that the samples, with the prices, should be left with him, in order that he might try to dispose of the grain in their absence. This man, whose name was Johnson, and who was originally the

boots

of the inn, soon got so much business in this way, that he opened an office at Bear Quay as a corn factor, and amassed a fortune.

The business of corn factors soon increased so much, that they erected a market in , which is called the . The building, with which coffee-houses are connected, is of the Doric order; and the quadrangle, where the samples of grain are exhibited, is capacious. The brokers at wished to render the a private market; but on application to parliament it was thrown open. Opposite to this market is a much neater though smaller structure, called

The New Exchange for Corn and Seed.

Adjoining the old is an elegant building called the

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
collapseCHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
collapseCHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
collapseCHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
collapseCHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
collapseCHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
collapseCHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
collapseCHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44306
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00068
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
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