The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas
1827

The New Post Office.

The New Post Office.

The architect of this edifice is R. Smirke, esq. It occupies the whole of the space between St. Martin's-le-Grand and Foster-lane in breadth, and extending from the backs of the houses in Cheapside to those in St. Anne's-lane in length. The character of the architecture is an excessive plainness. The principal front in St. Martin's-le-Grand has a portico of eight fluted Ionic columns in the centre, six in front, and two in flank, surmounted by a pediment; and at the extremities of the front, two other porticoes, each of which is composed of four columns of the same order, standing on a stylobate, and sustaining the entablature of the order, which is continued as a finish round the whole building. The intercolumniations are pierced with windows, and the spaces between these and the centre portico have each fourteen windows in two series; these portions of the building are flanked with sunk areas. The other fronts of the building are exceedingly lain ; they are almost destitute of ornament, and are all pierced with numerous windows. The interior is not in a sufficient state of forwardness to allow of a description; but the entrances, within the central portico, will lead into a large hall, flanked on each side by lofty Ionic colonnades, the columns corresponding with those of the exterior.

The architect of this edifice is R. Smirke, esq. It occupies the whole of the space between and in breadth, and extending from the backs of the houses in to those in St. Anne's-lane in length. The character of the architecture is an excessive plainness. The principal front in has a portico of fluted Ionic columns in the centre, in front, and in flank, surmounted by a pediment; and at the extremities of the front, other porticoes, each of which is composed of columns of the same order, standing on a stylobate, and sustaining the entablature of the order, which is continued as a finish round the whole building. The intercolumniations are pierced with windows, and the spaces between these and the centre portico have each windows in series; these portions of the building are flanked with sunk areas. The other fronts of the building are exceedingly lain ; they are almost destitute of ornament, and are all pierced with numerous windows. The interior is not in a sufficient state of forwardness to allow of a description; but the entrances, within the central portico, will lead into a large hall, flanked on each side by lofty Ionic colonnades, the columns corresponding with those of the exterior.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
collapseCHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
collapseCHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
collapseCHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
collapseCHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
collapseCHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
collapseCHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
collapseCHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44306
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00068
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
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