The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas
1827

The Papey.

The Papey.

This hospital belonged to the brotherhood of St. Charity and St. John the Evangelist, founded in 1430, by William Oliver, William Barnabie, and John Stafford, of London, priests, for a master, two wardens, &c. chaplains, chauntry priests, conducts, and other brethren and sisters that should be admitted into the church of St. Augustine Papey in the wall. The brethren of this house becoming lame, or otherwise in great poverty, were here relieved; as to have chambers, with certain allowance of bread, drink, and coals, and one old man and his wife to see them served, and to keep the house clean.

These poor priests of the Papey (as also the brotherhood of the threescore priests, and the company of clerks that were skilled in singing dirges and church offices) commonly attended at solemn funerals, as may be collected from the will of dame Jane Milbourn, widow of sir John Milbourn; who, in the year 1543, bequeathed to the brotherhood of the Papey to come to her burial, and to pray for her soul ten shillings; and likewise to the brotherhood of three-score priests in London to come to her burial, and to pray for her soul ten shillings.

This brotherhood (amongst others) was suppressed in the reign of Edward VI., since which time this house was occupied by sir Francis Walsingham, principal secretary of state to queen Elizabeth, and many other noble personages. The site of the hospital is the churchyard of St. Martin Outwich.

Adjoining to this hospital was a great house, with handsome courts and garden plats, some time pertaining to the Bassets, since that to the abbots of Bury in Suffolk, and therefore called Buries Mark, corruptly Bevis Marks; and, since the dissolution of the abbey of Bury, to Thomas Heneage the father, and sir Thomas Heneage the son. Maitland, ii. 782.

This hospital belonged to the brotherhood of St. Charity and St. John the Evangelist, founded in , by William Oliver, William Barnabie, and John Stafford, of London, priests, for a master, wardens, &c. chaplains, chauntry priests, conducts, and other brethren and sisters that should be admitted into the church of St. Augustine Papey in the wall. The brethren of this house becoming lame, or otherwise in great poverty, were here relieved; as to have chambers, with certain allowance of bread, drink, and coals, and old man and his wife to see them served, and to keep the house clean.

84

 

These poor priests of the Papey (as also the brotherhood of the threescore priests, and the company of clerks that were skilled in singing dirges and church offices) commonly attended at solemn funerals, as may be collected from the will of dame Jane Milbourn, widow of sir John Milbourn; who, in the year , bequeathed to the brotherhood of the Papey to come to her burial, and to pray for her soul ; and likewise to the brotherhood of -score priests in London to come to her burial, and to pray for her soul .

This brotherhood (amongst others) was suppressed in the reign of Edward VI., since which time this house was occupied by sir Francis Walsingham, principal secretary of state to queen Elizabeth, and many other noble personages. The site of the hospital is the churchyard of St. Martin Outwich.

Adjoining to this hospital was a great house, with handsome courts and garden plats,

some time pertaining to the Bassets, since that to the abbots of Bury in Suffolk, and therefore called Buries Mark, corruptly

Bevis Marks

; and, since the dissolution of the abbey of Bury, to Thomas Heneage the father, and sir Thomas Heneage the son.

 
 
Footnotes:

[] Maitland, ii. 782.

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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
collapseCHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
collapseCHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
collapseCHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
collapseCHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
collapseCHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
collapseCHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
collapseCHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44306
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00068
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