The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas
1827

Butchrers' Hall.

Butchrers' Hall.

The hall of the company of Butchers is a large edifice of brick, and was evidently erected only a few years after the great fire. The entrance is supported on each side by two columns of the Ionic order, with garlands suspended from the volutes. The hall is on the ground-floor; it has a handsome screen, and the ceiling is finished in stucco, beautifully worked. The walls are wainscotted about five feet in height all round, and over the master's chair is a bust of W. Beckford, esq. alderman of this ward. A noble staircase leads to the court-room, which has a richly ornamented ceiling in plaister. The chimney-piece is ornamented with foliage, fruit, &c.; above it a pediment with the companies' arms, and a painting of Peter's vision.

In this room are the following portraits: three-quarter lengths of J. Harwood, esq. T. Dalby, esq. 1817, J. Pocklington, esq. 1800, and P. Mellish, esq. 1798, sheriff of London.

A half length portrait of Henry VIII, in his cap and jewel, and a full length of George II.

Above the door of entrance is a bust of W. Beckford, esq. similar to the one in the hall.

At the north end the master's chair, ornamented by he royal arms.

In the parlour is a curious and massy oak table, of considerable solidity. The legs, of which there are four, represent vases of elegant form and workmanship.

In the parish of St. Mary-hill there was a place called Septem Camerae, which was either one house, or else so many rooms or chambers, which formerly belonged to some chantry; the rent whereof went towards the maintaining of a priest to pray superstitiously for the soul of the deceased, who left those Septem Camerae for that use. These, with other lands and tenements in the city, and elsewhere, were sold by king Edward VI. to Thomas Heybarn and Thomas Brand, for the sum of nine hundred and eighty-eight pounds eight shillings and a penny.

The hall of the company of Butchers is a large edifice of brick, and was evidently erected only a few years after the great fire. The entrance is supported on each side by columns of the Ionic order, with garlands suspended from the volutes. The hall is on the ground-floor; it has a handsome screen, and the ceiling is finished in stucco, beautifully worked. The walls are wainscotted about feet in height all round, and over the master's chair is a bust of W. Beckford, esq. alderman of this ward. A noble staircase leads to the court-room, which has a richly ornamented ceiling in plaister. The chimney-piece is ornamented with foliage, fruit, &c.; above it a pediment with the companies' arms, and a painting of Peter's vision.

In this room are the following portraits: -quarter lengths of J. Harwood, esq. T. Dalby, esq. , J. Pocklington, esq. , and P. Mellish, esq. , sheriff of London.

A half length portrait of Henry VIII, in his cap and jewel, and a full length of George II.

Above the door of entrance is a bust of W. Beckford, esq. similar to the in the hall.

124

 

At the north end the master's chair, ornamented by he royal arms.

In the parlour is a curious and massy oak table, of considerable solidity. The legs, of which there are , represent vases of elegant form and workmanship.

In the parish of St. Mary-hill there was a place called , which was either house, or else so many rooms or chambers, which formerly belonged to some chantry; the rent whereof went towards the maintaining of a priest to pray superstitiously for the soul of the deceased, who left those for that use. These, with other lands and tenements in the city, and elsewhere, were sold by king Edward VI. to Thomas Heybarn and Thomas Brand, for the sum of and a penny.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
collapseCHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
collapseCHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
collapseCHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
collapseCHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
collapseCHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
collapseCHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
collapseCHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44306
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00068
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
Usage: Detailed Rights