The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas
1827

Brotherhood of St. Nicholas.

Brotherhood of St. Nicholas.

On the west side of Bishopsgate street without the gate, were certain tenements of old time, pertaining to a brotherhood of St. Nicholas, granted to the parish clerks of London, for two chaplains to be kept in the chapel of St. Mary Magdalen, near unto the Guildhall of London, in the twenty-seventh of Henry VI. The first of the houses towards the north, and against the wall of the city, was some time a large inn or court, called the Wrestlers, from such a sign; and the last in the high-street, towards the south, was sometime also an inn, called the Angel, from such a sign. Amongst these said tenements was, on the same street side, an entry or court to the common hall of the said parish clerks, with alms-houses, seven in number, adjoining, for parish-clerks, and their wives, their widows, such as were advanced in years, and not able for labour. One of these, by the said brotherhood of parish-clerks was allowed sixteen pence the week; the other six had each of them nine-pence the week, according to the patent thereof granted. This brotherhood, being suppressed; in the reign of Edward VI. the hall, with the other buildings there, were given to Sir Robert Chester, a knight of Cambridgeshire; against whom the parish clerks commenced a suit in the reign of queen Mary; and being likely to have prevailed, the said sir Robert Chester pulled down the hall, sold the timber, stone, and lead, and thereupon the suit was ended. The alms-houses remained in queen Elizabeth's hands.

On the west side of without the gate, were certain tenements of old time, pertaining to a brotherhood of St. Nicholas, granted to the parish clerks of London, for chaplains to be kept in the chapel of , near unto the of London, in the of Henry VI. The of the houses towards the north, and against the wall of the city, was some time a large inn or court, called the Wrestlers, from such a sign; and the last in the high-street, towards the south, was

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sometime also an inn, called the Angel, from such a sign. Amongst these said tenements was, on the same street side, an entry or court to the common hall of the said parish clerks, with alms-houses, in number, adjoining, for parish-clerks, and their wives, their widows, such as were advanced in years, and not able for labour. of these, by the said brotherhood of parish-clerks was allowed the week; the other had each of them the week, according to the patent thereof granted. This brotherhood, being suppressed; in the of Edward VI. the hall, with the other buildings there, were given to Sir Robert Chester, a knight of Cambridgeshire; against whom the parish clerks commenced a suit in the reign of queen Mary; and being likely to have prevailed, the said sir Robert Chester pulled down the hall, sold the timber, stone, and lead, and thereupon the suit was ended. The alms-houses remained in queen Elizabeth's hands.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
collapseCHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
collapseCHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
collapseCHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
collapseCHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
collapseCHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
collapseCHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
collapseCHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44306
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00068
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
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