The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas
1827

The London Tavern.

The London Tavern.

The exterior is of brick, and very plain, the interior quite the contrary being fitted up in an elegant style. The principal room, which is on the third floor, is 73 feet long, 33 feet wide, and 36 feet in height; the ceiling is slightly coved, and round the room are attached pillars of the Corinthian order, the capitals and bases being gilt and the shafts, which are of blue and gold, fluted; these pillars support a rich architrave, above which are caryatidae supporting the cove which is ornamented with medallions painted in oil, and stucco ornaments. At the north and south ends of this noble room are coved recesses with galleries for music. From the ceiling depend five chandeliers of cut glass, the same that lord Amherst took to China as presents to the emperor, and on the failure of the embassy were brought back to England. On the first floor is another spacious room, near 40 feet in length, with a semi-circular recess, on each side of which are coupled columns of the Corinthian order; the ceiling is coved, and the whole decorated in the same splendid style as the apartment last described. The cellars are very extensive. The present proprietors are Messrs. Bleaden, Alexander & Co.

The pump on this side of Bishopsgate street, against St. Martin Outwich church, is thus noticed by Stow:--

Then in the very west corner ouer against the east end of St. Martin Outwitch churche, (from whence the streete windeth towardes the south) you had of olde time a fayre well with two buckets so fastened, that the drawing up of the one, let downe the other, but now of late (1598) that well is turned into a pumpe.

Opposite St. Martin Outwich church is the

The exterior is of brick, and very plain, the interior quite the contrary being fitted up in an elegant style. The principal room, which is on the floor, is feet long, feet wide, and feet in height; the ceiling is slightly coved, and round the room are attached pillars of the Corinthian order, the capitals and bases being gilt and the shafts, which are of blue and gold, fluted; these pillars support a rich architrave, above which are caryatidae supporting the cove which is ornamented with medallions painted in oil, and stucco ornaments. At the north and south ends of this noble room are coved recesses with galleries for music. From the ceiling depend chandeliers of cut glass, the same that lord Amherst took to China as presents to the emperor, and on the failure of the embassy were brought back to England. On the floor is another spacious room, near feet in length, with a semi-circular recess, on each side of which are coupled columns of the Corinthian order; the ceiling is coved, and the whole decorated in the same splendid style as the apartment last described. The cellars are very extensive. The present proprietors are Messrs. Bleaden, Alexander & Co.

The pump on this side of , against St. Martin Outwich church, is thus noticed by Stow:--

Then in the very west corner ouer against the east end of St. Martin Outwitch churche, (from whence the streete windeth towardes the south) you had of olde time a fayre well with

two

buckets so fastened, that the drawing up of the

one

, let downe the other, but now of late (

1598

) that well is turned into a pumpe.

Opposite St. Martin Outwich church is the

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
collapseCHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
collapseCHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
collapseCHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
collapseCHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
collapseCHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
collapseCHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
collapseCHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44306
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00068
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
Usage: Detailed Rights