The History and Antiquities of London, Westminster, Southwark, and Parts Adjacent, vol. 3

Allen, Thomas
1827

The Monument.

The Monument.

The Monument is a noble fluted column of the Doric order, and was erected rather to perpetuate the charge against the Roman Catholics of setting fire to the city, than as a memento of its destruction and restoration. The Monument, like all public buildings of the period, was designed by sir Christopher Wren. This column is 202 feet high, that being also the distance of its base from the spot where the fire commenced. The pedestal is forty feet high, and the plinth twenty-eight feet square; the shaft of the column is 120 feet high, and fifteen in diameter: it is hollow, and incloses a staircase of black marble, consisting of 345 steps, by which a balcony, within thirty-two feet of the top, is reached. The column is surmounted with an urnSir C. Wren originally intended that this noble column should have been surmounted with a colossal statue of Charles II. in brass gilt, or else a figure of a woman, crowned with turrets, holding a sword and cap of maintenance, with other ensigns of the city's grandeur and re-erection. forty-two feet high, with flames issuing from it. The cubic measurements of this column are as follows:-- Feet. The solidity of the whole fabric, from the bottom of the lowest plinth to the black marble under the urn, the cylinder of the staircase only deducted, and the stone for the carving not allowed for37396 The black marble that covers the capital287 Ditto the lanthorn64 From this solidity deduct, For eight great niches281 For three doors and passages289 For three sides reveyled486 For rough block1499 For rubble work7185 In all9740 The remainder is27656 To this add, upon the account of the carvings in the front, the four great dragons, and festoons540 There remains of solid Portland stone28196

On three sides of the pedestal are inscriptions (of which the following are facsimiles), written by Dr. Thomas Gale, afterwards dean of York. The fourth side is occupied with a piece of sculpture.

On the north side ANNO CHRISTI CIODCLXVI. DIE IV. NONAS SEPTEMBRESS HINC IN ORIENTEM PEDVM CCII. INTERVALLO QUAE EST HVIVSCE COLVMAE ALTITVDO ERVPIT DE MEDIA NOCTE INCENDIVM QVOD VENTO SPIRANTE HAVSIT ETIAM LONGINQVA ET PARTES PER OMNES POPVLABVNDVM FEREBATVR EVM IMPETV ET FRAGORE INCREDIBILI XXCIX TEMPLA PORTAS PRETORIVM, AEDES PVBLICAS, PTOCHOTROPHIA SCHOLAS BIBLIOTHECAS, INSVLARVM MAGNVM NVMERVM DOMVVM CCICCOOOOOOCC. VICOS CD. ABSVMPSIT. DE XXVI. REGIONIEVS XV. FVNDITVS DELEVIT, ALIAS VIII. LACERAS ET SEMIVSTAS RELIQVIA VRBIS CADAVER AD CDXXXVI. IVGERAT HINC AB ARCE PER TAMISIS RIPAM AD TEMPLARIORVM FANVM ILLINC AB EVRO AQVILONALI PORTA SECVNDVM MVROS AD FOSSAE FLETANAE CAPVT PORREXIT ADVERSVS OPES CIVIVM ET FORTVNAS INFESTVM ERGAVITAS INNOCVVM VTPER OMNIA REFERRET SVPREMAM ILLAM MVNDI EXVSTIONEM. VELOX CLADES FVIT EXIGVVM TEMPVS EANDEM VIDIT CIVITATEM FLORENTISSIMAM ET NULLAM TERTIO DIE CVM IAM PLANE EVICERAT HVMANA CONSILIA ET SVBSIDIA OMNIA, COELITVS VT PAR EST CREDERE IVSSVS STETIT FATALIS IGNIS ET QVAQVA VERSVM ELANGVIT. SED FVROR PAPISTICVS QVI TAM DIRA PATRAVIT NONDVM RESTINGVITVR

Translation. In the year of Christ 1666, the 2nd day of September, eastward from hence, at the distance of 202 feet, the height of this column, a terrible fire broke out about midnight; which, driven on by a strong wind, not only wasted the adjacent parts, but also very remote places, with incredible noise and fury. It consumed 89 churches, the city gates, Guildhall, many public structures, hospitals, schools, libraries, a vast number of stately edifices, 13,200 dwelling-houses, and 430 streets; of the twenty-six wards, it utterly destroyed fifteen, and left eight others shattered and half burnt. The ruins of the city were 436 acres, from the Tower by the Thames side to the Temple church, and from the north-east along the city-wall to Holborn-bridge. To the estates and fortunes of the citizens it was merciless, but to their lives very favourable, that it might in all things resemble the conflagration of the world. The destruction was sudden; for, in a small space of time, the city was seen most flourishing, and reduced to nothing. Three days after, when this fatal fire had baffled all human counsels and endeavours, in the opinion of all, it stopped, as it were, by a command from heaven, and was on every side extinguished. But papistical malice, which perpetrated such mischiefs, is not yet restrained.

On the south side, CAROLVS II.MART. F. MAG. BRIT. FRAN. ET HIB. REX. FID. D. PRINCEPS CLEMENTISSIMVS MISERATVS LVCTVOSAM RERVM FACIEM PLVRIMA FVMANTIBVS IAM TVM RVINIS IN SOLATIVM CIVIVM ET VRBIS SVAE ORNAMENTVM PROVIDIT TRIBVTVM REMISIT, PRECES ORDINIS ET POPVLI LONDINENSIS RETVLIT AD REGNI SENATVM QVI CONTINVO DECREVIT VT PVBLICA OPERA PECVNIA PVBLICA EX VECTIGALI CARBONIS FOSSILIS ORIVNDA IN MELIOREM FORMAM RESTITVERENTVR, VTIQVE AEDES SACRAE ET D. PAVLI TEMPLVM A FVNDMENTIS OMNI MAGNI- FICENTIA EXTRVERENTVR PONTES PORTAE CARCERES NOVI FIERENT EMVNDAREMTVR ALVEI VICI AD REGVLAM RESPON- DERENT CLIVI COMPLANARENTVR APERIERNTVR ANGIPOR- TVS, FORA ET MACELLA IN AREAS SEPOSITAS ELIMINAREN- TVR. CENSVIT ETIAM VTISINGVLAE DOMVS MVRIS INTER- GERINIS CONCLVDERENTVR, UNIVERSAE IN FRONTEM PARI ALTITVDINE SONSVRGERENT, OMNESQVE PARIETES SAXO QVADRATO AVT COCTO LATERE SOLIDARENTVR; VTIQVE NEMINI LICERET VLTRA SUPTENNIVM AEDIFICANDO IMMO- RARI. AD HAEC LITES DE TERMINIS ORITVRAS LEGE LATA PRAESCIDIT; ADJECIT QVOQVE SVPPLICATIONES ANNVAS, ET AD AETERNAM POSTERORVM MEMORIAM II. C. P C. FESTINATVR VNDIQVE, RESVRPIT LONDINVM, MAIORI CELERITA- TE AN SPLENDORE INCERTVM: VNVM TRIENNIVM ABSOLVIT QVOD SECVLI OPVS CREDEBATVR.

Translation. Charles the Second, son of Charles the Martyr, king of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith, a most gracious prince, commiserating the deplorable state of things, whilst the ruins were yet smoking, provided for the comfort of his citizens, and the ornament of his city; remitted their taxes, and referred the petitions of the magistrates and inhabitants to the parliament; who immediately passed an act, that public works should be restored to greater beauty, with public money, to be raised by an imposition on coals; that churches, and the cathedral of St. Paul's, should be rebuilt from their foundations, with all magnificence; that the bridges, gates, and prisons should be new made, the sewers cleansed, the streets made straight and regular, such as were steep levelled, and those too narrow made wider, markets and shambles removed to separate places. They also enacted, that every house should be built with party-walls, and all in front raised of an equal height, and those walls all of square stone or brick; and that no man should delay building beyond the space of seven years.

On the east side is the following:-- INCEPTA RICHARDO FORD, EQUITE PRAETORE LOND: AD MDCLXXI PERDVCTA ALTIVS GEORGIO WATERMAN, EQ : PVAE ROBERTO HANSON, EQ: PVAE GVLIELMO HOOKER, EQ: PV ROBERTO VINER, EQ: PV IOSBPHO SHELDON, EQ: PV PERFECTA THOMA DAVIES, EQ: PRAE: VRB ANNO DM MDCLXXVII

Translation.

This pillar was began, Sir Richard Ford, knt., being lord mayor of London, in the year 1671 Carried on In the mayoralties of Sir George Waterman, knt. Sir George Hanson, knt. Sir Wiliam Hooker, knt. Sir Robert Viner, knt. Sir Joseph Sheldon, knt. And finished in that of Sir Thomas Davies, in the year 1677.

On the west side is a large piece of sculpture, allegorically representing the destruction and rebuilding of the city. In one compartment the city appears in flames; the inhabitants, with outstretched arms, calling for succour; the insignia of the city laying thrown down and mutilated, while a female, wearing a civic crown and holding a sword, shews that the municipal authority was still maintained. The king, Charles II., occupies a conspicuous situation; he is represented in a Roman habit, and is trampling under his feet Envy, which seeks to renew the calamity, by blowing flames out of its mouth. Near the sovereign are three females, representing Liberty, Imagination, and Architecture. Time is offering consolation to the distressed, and Providence gives assurance of peace and plenty. There are also several other figures, including Mars and Fortitude. The whole was executed by that eminent sculptor, Caius Gabriel Cibber.

Above this, and round the cornice of the pedestal, are large enrichments of trophy work, and the king's and cities' arms, the sword, mace, and cap of maintenance, with four immense dragons at the angles, the whole executed in a bold manner.

Round the base there is the following inscription, attributing the destruction of the city to the papists. West. THIS PILLAR WAS SET VP IN PERPETVALL REMEMBRANCE OF THAT MOST DREADFVLL BVRNING OF THIS PROTESTANT South. CITY, BEGVN AND CARRYED ON BY YE TREACHERY & MALICE OF YE POPISH FACTIO IN YE BEGINNING OF SEPTEMBR IN YE YEAR OF East. OVR LORD 1666, IN ORDER FOR CARRYING ON THEIR HORRID PLOTT FOR EXTIRPATING North. THE PROTESTANT AND OLD ENGLISH LIBERTY, AND INTRODUCING POPERY AND SLAVERY.

This inscription was defaced during the reign of James II., but on his abdication, and the accession of William III., it was very deeply engraved. It is due to the memory of the great architect, Sir Christopher Wren, to state the inscriptions were not suggested by him, but adopted contrary to his wishes, instead of the following elegant composition which he had prepared:--

Inscription for the great pillar, or monument of London, according to the first conception of sir Christopher Wren.

Qui celsam spectas molem idem quoque infaustum & fatalem toti quondam civitati vides locum. Hic quippe, anno Christi M.DC.LXVI. 2 Sept. altera post mediam noctem hora, ex casa humili, prima se extulit flamma, quae, Austro flante, adeo brevi invaluit, ut non tantum tota fere intra muros urbs, sed et aedificia quaecunque arcem, et templariorum hospitium, quaecunque denique ripas fluminis, et remotissima civitatis interjacent moenia, ferali absumpta fuerint incendio Tridui spatio, C. Templa, Plateae CCCC. et plura quam XIV. Domorum millia flammis absorpta fuere. Innumeri cives omnibus suis fortunis exuti, et sub dio agitare coacti, infinitee, et toto orbe congestae opes in cinerem et favillam redactae: ita ut de urbe omnium quotquot sol aspicit amplissima, et faelicissima, praeter nomen et famam, et immensos ruinarum aggeres, vix quicquam superessit. Carolus secundus, Dei gratia, rex Magnae Britanniae, Franciae et Hiberniae, anno regni XVIII. et plerique Angliae proceres consumpta incendio urbe pene universa, eademque tiennio spatio in ampliorem modum instaurata, et non ut ante ligneis ant luteis, sed partum lateritiis, partim marmoreis aedificiis, et operibus, ita ornata, ut e suis ruinis pulcrior multo prodiisse videatur; auctis praeterea ad immensam magnitudinem urbis pomoeriis; ad aeternam utriusque facti memoriam, hic, ubi tantae cladis prima emicuit flamma, Monumentum posuere. Discat praesens et futura aetas, nequa similis ingruat clades, tempestivis Numea placare votis: beneficium vero regis et procerum, quorum liberalitate, praeter ornatum, major etiam urbi accessit securitas, grata mente recognoscat. 0 quantum tibi debet Augusta, Tot nascentia templa, tot renata, Tot spectacula! Martial.

On the site of the Monument stood the parish church of St. Margaret; the patronage of this rectory was in the abbot and convent, and the bishop of Winchester, till Queen Mary, by her letters patent, 1553, granted to the bishop of London and his successors, in whom it still remains, but subject to the arch-deacon. The church being consumed in the great fire 1666 was not rebuilt, the parish being annexed to the adjacent one of St. Magnus.

The date of the first erection of this church is not known, though it was of considerable antiquity, from Roger de Bredefeld and Edward Hoseland, being rectors before the year 1328.

In the cellar of the house, No. 45, on the eastern side of this street, and nearly adjoining to the site of St. Leonard's Church, are the remains of an ancient crypt, which was formerly groined and vaulted with stone, a low pointed doorway and the semi-pillars which sustained the vault still remain, the whole apparently the workmanship of the sixteenth century. In the passage belonging to No. 60, on the same side of the street, a vestige of a similar crypt was recently destroyed.

At the east end of Crooked-lane and opposite the Monument, was in former times a palace built of stone, in which Edward the Black Prince, son of Edward III. resided, it was afterwards let out for an inn and was known by the name of the Black-bull-inn.

Almost contiguous to the north west corner of London-bridge, was a postern gate, denominated Oystergate, from oysters being anciently sold there.

At the north west extremity of this ward, in a court leading from Gracechurch-street, to Lombard-street is the

The Monument is a noble fluted column of the Doric order, and was erected rather to perpetuate the charge against the Roman Catholics of setting fire to the city, than as a memento of its destruction and restoration. The Monument, like all public buildings of the period, was designed by sir Christopher Wren. This column is feet high, that being also the distance of its base from the spot where the fire commenced. The pedestal is feet high, and the plinth feet square; the shaft of the column is feet high, and in diameter: it is hollow, and incloses a staircase of black marble, consisting of steps, by which a balcony, within feet of the top, is reached. The column is surmounted with an urn feet high, with flames issuing from it.

The cubic measurements of this column are as follows:--
 Feet.
The solidity of the whole fabric, from the bottom of the lowest plinth to the black marble under the urn, the cylinder of the staircase only deducted, and the stone for the carving not allowed for37396
The black marble that covers the capital287
Ditto the lanthorn64
From this solidity deduct,
For eight great niches281
For three doors and passages289
For three sides reveyled486
For rough block1499
For rubble work7185
In all9740
The remainder is27656
To this add, upon the account of the carvings in the front, the four great dragons, and festoons540
There remains of solid Portland stone28196

188

 

On sides of the pedestal are inscriptions (of which the following are facsimiles), written by Dr. Thomas Gale, afterwards dean of York. The side is occupied with a piece of sculpture.

On the north side

ANNO CHRISTI CIODCLXVI. DIE IV. NONAS SEPTEMBRESS

HINC IN ORIENTEM PEDVM CCII. INTERVALLO QUAE EST

HVIVSCE COLVMAE ALTITVDO ERVPIT DE MEDIA NOCTE

INCENDIVM QVOD VENTO SPIRANTE HAVSIT ETIAM LONGINQVA

ET PARTES PER OMNES POPVLABVNDVM FEREBATVR

EVM IMPETV ET FRAGORE INCREDIBILI XXCIX TEMPLA

PORTAS PRETORIVM, AEDES PVBLICAS, PTOCHOTROPHIA

SCHOLAS BIBLIOTHECAS, INSVLARVM MAGNVM NVMERVM

DOMVVM CCICCOOOOOOCC. VICOS CD. ABSVMPSIT.

DE XXVI. REGIONIEVS XV. FVNDITVS DELEVIT, ALIAS VIII. LACERAS

ET SEMIVSTAS RELIQVIA VRBIS CADAVER AD CDXXXVI. IVGERAT

HINC AB ARCE PER TAMISIS RIPAM AD TEMPLARIORVM FANVM

ILLINC AB EVRO AQVILONALI PORTA SECVNDVM MVROS

AD FOSSAE FLETANAE CAPVT PORREXIT ADVERSVS OPES CIVIVM

ET FORTVNAS INFESTVM ERGAVITAS INNOCVVM VTPER OMNIA

REFERRET SVPREMAM ILLAM MVNDI EXVSTIONEM.

VELOX CLADES FVIT EXIGVVM TEMPVS EANDEM VIDIT

CIVITATEM FLORENTISSIMAM ET NULLAM

TERTIO DIE CVM IAM PLANE EVICERAT HVMANA CONSILIA

ET SVBSIDIA OMNIA, COELITVS VT PAR EST CREDERE

IVSSVS STETIT FATALIS IGNIS ET QVAQVA VERSVM

ELANGVIT.

SED

FVROR PAPISTICVS QVI TAM DIRA PATRAVIT NONDVM

RESTINGVITVR

In the year of Christ , the , eastward from hence, at the distance of feet, the height of this column, a terrible fire broke out about midnight; which, driven on by a strong wind, not only wasted the adjacent parts, but also very remote places, with incredible noise and fury. It consumed churches, the city gates, , many public structures, hospitals, schools, libraries, a vast number of stately edifices, dwelling-houses, and streets; of the wards, it utterly destroyed , and left others shattered and half burnt. The ruins of the city were acres, from the Tower by the Thames side to the Temple church, and from the north-east along the city-wall to Holborn-bridge. To the estates and fortunes of the citizens it was merciless, but to their lives very favourable, that it might in all things resemble the conflagration of the world. The destruction was sudden; for, in a small space of time, the city was seen most flourishing, and reduced to nothing. days after, when this fatal fire had baffled all human counsels and endeavours, in the opinion of all, it stopped, as it were, by a command from heaven, and was on every side extinguished. But papistical malice, which perpetrated such mischiefs, is not yet restrained.

On the south side,

189

CAROLVS II.MART. F. MAG. BRIT. FRAN. ET HIB. REX. FID. D.

PRINCEPS CLEMENTISSIMVS MISERATVS LVCTVOSAM RERVM

FACIEM PLVRIMA FVMANTIBVS IAM TVM RVINIS IN SOLATIVM

CIVIVM ET VRBIS SVAE ORNAMENTVM PROVIDIT TRIBVTVM

REMISIT, PRECES ORDINIS ET POPVLI LONDINENSIS RETVLIT

AD REGNI SENATVM QVI CONTINVO DECREVIT VT PVBLICA

OPERA PECVNIA PVBLICA EX VECTIGALI CARBONIS FOSSILIS

ORIVNDA IN MELIOREM FORMAM RESTITVERENTVR, VTIQVE AEDES

SACRAE ET D. PAVLI TEMPLVM A FVNDMENTIS OMNI MAGNI-

FICENTIA EXTRVERENTVR PONTES PORTAE CARCERES NOVI

FIERENT EMVNDAREMTVR ALVEI VICI AD REGVLAM RESPON-

DERENT CLIVI COMPLANARENTVR APERIERNTVR ANGIPOR-

TVS, FORA ET MACELLA IN AREAS SEPOSITAS ELIMINAREN-

TVR. CENSVIT ETIAM VTISINGVLAE DOMVS MVRIS INTER-

GERINIS CONCLVDERENTVR, UNIVERSAE IN FRONTEM PARI

ALTITVDINE SONSVRGERENT, OMNESQVE PARIETES SAXO

QVADRATO AVT COCTO LATERE SOLIDARENTVR; VTIQVE

NEMINI LICERET VLTRA SUPTENNIVM AEDIFICANDO IMMO-

RARI. AD HAEC LITES DE TERMINIS ORITVRAS LEGE LATA

PRAESCIDIT; ADJECIT QVOQVE SVPPLICATIONES ANNVAS, ET

AD AETERNAM POSTERORVM MEMORIAM II. C. P C.

FESTINATVR VNDIQVE, RESVRPIT LONDINVM, MAIORI CELERITA-

TE AN SPLENDORE INCERTVM: VNVM TRIENNIVM ABSOLVIT

QVOD SECVLI OPVS CREDEBATVR.

Charles the , son of Charles the Martyr, king of Great , France, and Ireland, defender of the faith, a most gracious prince, commiserating the deplorable state of things, whilst the ruins were yet smoking, provided for the comfort of his citizens, and the ornament of his city; remitted their taxes, and referred the petitions of the magistrates and inhabitants to the parliament; who immediately passed an act, that public works should be restored to greater beauty, with public money, to be raised by an imposition on coals; that churches, and the cathedral of , should be rebuilt from their foundations, with all magnificence; that the bridges, gates, and prisons should be new made, the sewers cleansed, the streets made straight and regular, such as were steep levelled, and those too narrow made wider, markets and shambles removed to separate places. They also enacted, that every house should be built with party-walls, and all in front raised of an equal height, and those walls all of square stone or brick; and that no man should delay building beyond the space of years.

On the east side is the following:--

INCEPTA

RICHARDO FORD, EQUITE

PRAETORE LOND: AD MDCLXXI

PERDVCTA ALTIVS

GEORGIO WATERMAN, EQ : PVAE

ROBERTO HANSON, EQ: PVAE

GVLIELMO HOOKER, EQ: PV

ROBERTO VINER, EQ: PV

IOSBPHO SHELDON, EQ: PV

PERFECTA

THOMA DAVIES, EQ: PRAE: VRB

ANNO DM MDCLXXVII

This pillar was began, Sir Richard Ford, knt., being lord mayor of London, in the year Carried on In the mayoralties of Sir George Waterman, knt. Sir George Hanson, knt. Sir Wiliam Hooker, knt. Sir Robert Viner, knt. Sir Joseph Sheldon, knt. And finished in that of Sir Thomas Davies, in the year .

On the west side is a large piece of sculpture, allegorically representing the destruction and rebuilding of the city. In compartment the city appears in flames; the inhabitants, with outstretched arms, calling for succour; the insignia of the city laying thrown down and mutilated, while a female, wearing a civic crown and holding a sword, shews that the municipal authority was still maintained. The king, Charles II., occupies a conspicuous situation; he is represented in a Roman habit, and is trampling under his feet Envy, which seeks to renew the calamity, by blowing flames out of its mouth. Near the sovereign are females, representing Liberty, Imagination, and Architecture. Time is offering consolation to the distressed, and Providence gives assurance of peace and plenty. There are also several other figures, including Mars and Fortitude. The whole was executed by that eminent sculptor, Caius Gabriel Cibber.

Above this, and round the cornice of the pedestal, are large enrichments of trophy work, and the king's and cities' arms, the sword, mace, and cap of maintenance, with immense dragons at the angles, the whole executed in a bold manner.

Round the base there is the following inscription, attributing the destruction of the city to the papists.

West.

THIS PILLAR WAS SET VP IN PERPETVALL REMEMBRANCE OF THAT MOST

DREADFVLL BVRNING OF THIS PROTESTANT

South.

CITY, BEGVN AND CARRYED ON BY YE TREACHERY & MALICE OF YE POPISH

FACTIO IN YE BEGINNING OF SEPTEMBR IN YE YEAR OF

East.

OVR LORD

1666

, IN ORDER FOR CARRYING ON THEIR HORRID PLOTT FOR

EXTIRPATING

North.

THE PROTESTANT AND OLD ENGLISH LIBERTY, AND INTRODUCING POPERY

AND SLAVERY.

191

 

This inscription was defaced during the reign of James II., but on his abdication, and the accession of William III., it was very deeply engraved. It is due to the memory of the great architect, Sir Christopher Wren, to state the inscriptions were not suggested by him, but adopted contrary to his wishes, instead of the following elegant composition which he had prepared:--

Qui celsam spectas molem idem quoque infaustum & fatalem toti quondam civitati vides locum. Hic quippe, anno Christi M.DC.LXVI. 2 Sept. altera post mediam noctem hora, ex casa humili, prima se extulit flamma, quae, Austro flante, adeo brevi invaluit, ut non tantum tota fere intra muros urbs, sed et aedificia quaecunque arcem, et templariorum hospitium, quaecunque denique ripas fluminis, et remotissima civitatis interjacent moenia, ferali absumpta fuerint incendio Tridui spatio, C. Templa, Plateae CCCC. et plura quam XIV. Domorum millia flammis absorpta fuere. Innumeri cives omnibus suis fortunis exuti, et sub dio agitare coacti, infinitee, et toto orbe congestae opes in cinerem et favillam redactae: ita ut de urbe omnium quotquot sol aspicit amplissima, et faelicissima, praeter nomen et famam, et immensos ruinarum aggeres, vix quicquam superessit.

Carolus secundus, Dei gratia, rex Magnae Britanniae, Franciae et Hiberniae, anno regni XVIII. et plerique Angliae proceres consumpta incendio urbe pene universa, eademque tiennio spatio in ampliorem modum instaurata, et non ut ante ligneis ant luteis, sed partum lateritiis, partim marmoreis aedificiis, et operibus, ita ornata, ut e suis ruinis pulcrior multo prodiisse videatur; auctis praeterea ad immensam magnitudinem urbis pomoeriis; ad aeternam utriusque facti memoriam, hic, ubi tantae cladis prima emicuit flamma,

Monumentum posuere.

Discat praesens et futura aetas, nequa similis ingruat clades, tempestivis Numea placare votis: beneficium vero regis et procerum, quorum liberalitate, praeter ornatum, major etiam urbi accessit securitas, grata mente recognoscat. 0 quantum tibi debet Augusta, Tot nascentia templa, tot renata, Tot spectacula! Martial.

On the site of the Monument stood the parish church of St. Margaret; the patronage of this rectory was in the abbot and convent, and the bishop of Winchester, till Queen Mary, by her letters patent, , granted to the bishop of London and his successors, in whom it still remains, but subject to the arch-deacon. The church being consumed in the great fire was not

192

rebuilt, the parish being annexed to the adjacent of St. Magnus.

The date of the erection of this church is not known, though it was of considerable antiquity, from Roger de Bredefeld and Edward Hoseland, being rectors before the year .

In the cellar of the house, No. , on the eastern side of this street, and nearly adjoining to the site of , are the remains of an ancient crypt, which was formerly groined and vaulted with stone, a low pointed doorway and the semi-pillars which sustained the vault still remain, the whole apparently the workmanship of the century. In the passage belonging to No. , on the same side of the street, a vestige of a similar crypt was recently destroyed.

At the east end of Crooked-lane and opposite the Monument, was in former times a palace built of stone, in which Edward the Black Prince, son of Edward III. resided, it was afterwards let out for an inn and was known by the name of the Black-bull-inn.

Almost contiguous to the north west corner of London-bridge, was a postern gate, denominated Oystergate, from oysters being anciently sold there.

At the north west extremity of this ward, in a court leading from , to is the

 
 
Footnotes:

[] Sir C. Wren originally intended that this noble column should have been surmounted with a colossal statue of Charles II. in brass gilt, or else a figure of a woman, crowned with turrets, holding a sword and cap of maintenance, with other ensigns of the city's grandeur and re-erection.

View all images in this book
 Title Page
 Dedication
 CHAPTER I: The site, extent, buildings, population, commerce, and a view of the progressive increase of London
 CHAPTER II: List of the parishes and churches in London, with their incumbents, &c
collapseCHAPTER III: History and Topography of Aldersgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER IV: History and Topography of Aldgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER V: History and Topography of Bassishaw Ward
collapseCHAPTER VI: History and Topography of Billingsgate Ward
collapseCHAPTER VII: History and Topography of Bishopsgate Ward, Without and Within
collapseCHAPTER VIII: History and Topography of Bread-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER IX: History and Topography of Bridge Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER X: History and Topography of Broad-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XI: History and Topography of Candlewick Ward
collapseCHAPTER XII: History and Topography of Castle Baynard Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIII: History and Topography of Cheap Ward
collapseCHAPTER XIV: History and Topography of Coleman-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XV: History and Topography of Cordwainer's-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVI: History and Topography of Cornhill Ward
collapseCHAPTER XVII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XVIII: History and Topography of Cripplegate Yard Without
collapseCHAPTER XIX: History and Topography of Dowgate Yard
collapseCHAPTER XX: History and Topography of Farringdom Ward Within
collapseCHAPTER XXI: History and Topography of Farringdon Ward Without
collapseCHAPTER XXII: History and Topography of Langbourn Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIII: History and Topography of Lime-street Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXIV: History and Topogrpahy of Portsoken Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXV: History and Topography of Queenhithe Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVI: History and Topography of Tower Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVII: History and Topography of Vintry Ward
collapseCHAPTER XXVIII: History and Topography of Wallbrook Ward
This object is in collection:
Edwin C. Bolles papers
Subjects
London (England)--History
Antiquities
Permanent URL
http://hdl.handle.net/10427/44306
ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00068
To Cite: DCA Citation Guide
Usage: Detailed Rights