History of Tufts College, 1854-1896

Start, Alaric Bertrand
1896

CHAPTER SIXTH:THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.

CHAPTER SIXTH:THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.

IT is easy to see, in tracing the development of Tufts College, that it will not be many years before it will be justified in assuming the more pretentious title of University. The latest step to be taken in this direction was the organization of the Medical School. Twice in the history of the college - the last time in 1885 - applications for incorporation were received from medical institutions, but the Trustees reported "inexpedient" in each case; and not until August 28, 1893, was a vote passed establishing such a school in connection with the college.

Doctors Dudley, Nott, Thayer, Hall, Chipman, Johnson, and Wheatley were the original organizers of the school. These gentlemen were members of the Faculty of the Boston College of Physicians and Surgeons; but becoming dissatisfied with the condition which affairs were rapidly assuming at that institution, they resigned, formed a school of their own, and made application to the Trustees of Tufts College for incorporation, agreeing, however, to retain the entire responsibility for the school during the first three years of its existence.

They held the first regular Faculty meeting August 29, 1893, at which arrangements were made for announcements. At this meeting professorships were established in Physiology and Hygiene, Anatomy, Pathology, Surgery, Practice of Medicine, Obstetrics, Materia Medica and Therapeutics, and Gynæcology. Dr. Albert Nott was appointed Professor of Physiology, Dr. Charles P. Thayer Professor of General, Descriptive, and Surgical Anatomy, Dr. Henry W. Dudley Professor of Pathology, Dr. William R. Chipman Professor of the Principles and Practice of Surgery and Operative Surgery, Dr. Walter L. Hall Professor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, Dr. John W. Johnson Professor of Obstetrics and Gynæcology, Dr. Frank G. Wheatley Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. Drs. Austin, Tenney, Webber, and Hutchinson were appointed lecturers, Drs. Knowlton and Peirce demonstrators, and Drs. Raddin, White, Thorpe, and Cutler assistants. Dr. Nott was elected Dean, Dr. Thayer Secretary, and Dr. Johnson Treasurer of the School.

The building at 188 Boylston Street, Boston, was taken September 1, 1893, and the first course of lectures opened October 4th of that year.

The object of the school since its beginning has been to provide a thorough course of instruction in medical science at moderate charges, and open to both sexes on equal terms. In the brief time at the disposal of the authorities it was impossible to obtain quarters for the school which were altogether satisfactory, but since the opening the facilities have been greatly improved, and no pains have been spared in equipping the school, to make the instruction thorough, complete, and practical.

The course of study at present consists of a three years graded course of didactic and clinical lectures and recitations, but after this year a four years course will be required.

During the past year the clinical and other advantages have been greatly increased, so that the school is prepared to offer every opportunity needed by the undergraduate in medicine. The corps of instruction has been also strengthened by the addition to the Faculty of such well-known men as Samuel G. Webber, A. B., M. D., Professor of Neurology; Ernest W. Cushing, A. B., M. D., Professor of Gynæcology; Arthur E. Austin, A. B., M. D., Professor of Medical Chemistry; Charles A. Pitkin, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of General Chemistry; Harold Williams, A. B., M. D., Clinical Professor of Pediatrics; John A. Tenney, M. D., Professor of Ophthalmology; John L. Hildreth, A. B., M. D., Professor of Clinical Medicine; Herbert L. Smith, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical Surgery; Thomas M. Durell, M. D., Professor of Medical Jurisprudence; and Frederick L. Jack, M. D., Professor of Otology; and to the list of instructors, lecturers, and assistants, William R. Woodbury, A. B., M. D., George A. Webster, M. D., Fred H. Morse, M. D., Frank B. Brown, M. D., William P. Derby, M. D., Charles G. Cumston, M. D., E. C. Stowell, M. D., Albert E. Rogers, M. D., T. A. Mighill, Ph. D., T. F. Greene, M. D., J. C. D. Clark, M. D., H. S. Dearing, M. D., H. W. White, M. D., W. J. Otis, M. D., and W. S. Boardman, M. D. Professor J. S. Kingsley, of the College of Letters, served as lecturer on Histology during the first two years of the school, being succeeded by G. A. Bates, D. D. S., in 1895.

The enrolment of students for the college year 1893-94 was eighty, and twenty-two were graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine at Commencement in June, 1894, eight of this number being women.

For 1894-95, ninety-six students were entered, the graduating class numbering nineteen, while for the present year (1895-96) there are one hundred and seventy-three matriculates.

Owing to the rapid increase in students, the building, although the school occupies three complete stories, including lecture rooms, laboratories, reading rooms, dissecting room, etc., has become overcrowded, and a hall on the corner of Boylston and Tremont Streets has been leased as an additional lecture room.

As the school is the only co-educational school in New England which is recognized by the Massachusetts Medical Society, it has a field of its own. This, with the certainty of a new building very soon, with the constantly increasing clinical advantages, with the hearty indorsement of the medical profession in this part of the country, and the rapid increase in the number of students, assures a brilliant and prosperous future for Tufts College Medical School.

IT is easy to see, in tracing the development of Tufts College, that it will not be many years before it will be justified in assuming the more pretentious title of University. The latest step to be taken in this direction was the organization of the Medical School. Twice in the history of the college - the last time in 1885 - applications for incorporation were received from medical institutions, but the Trustees reported "inexpedient" in each case; and not until August 28, 1893, was a vote passed establishing such a school in connection with the college.

Doctors Dudley, Nott, Thayer, Hall, Chipman, Johnson, and Wheatley were the original organizers of the school. These gentlemen were members of the Faculty of the Boston College of Physicians and Surgeons; but becoming dissatisfied with the condition which affairs were rapidly assuming at that institution, they resigned, formed a school of their own, and made application to the Trustees of Tufts College for incorporation, agreeing, however, to retain the entire responsibility for the school during the first three years of its existence.

They held the first regular Faculty meeting August 29, 1893, at which arrangements were made for announcements. At this meeting professorships were established in Physiology and Hygiene, Anatomy, Pathology, Surgery, Practice of Medicine, Obstetrics, Materia Medica and Therapeutics, and Gynæcology. Dr. Albert Nott was appointed Professor of Physiology, Dr. Charles P. Thayer Professor of General,

86

Descriptive, and Surgical Anatomy, Dr. Henry W. Dudley Professor of Pathology, Dr. William R. Chipman Professor of the Principles and Practice of Surgery and Operative Surgery, Dr. Walter L. Hall Professor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, Dr. John W. Johnson Professor of Obstetrics and Gynæcology, Dr. Frank G. Wheatley Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. Drs. Austin, Tenney, Webber, and Hutchinson were appointed lecturers, Drs. Knowlton and Peirce demonstrators, and Drs. Raddin, White, Thorpe, and Cutler assistants. Dr. Nott was elected Dean, Dr. Thayer Secretary, and Dr. Johnson Treasurer of the School.

The building at 188 Boylston Street, Boston, was taken September 1, 1893, and the first course of lectures opened October 4th of that year.

The object of the school since its beginning has been to provide a thorough course of instruction in medical science at moderate charges, and open to both sexes on equal terms. In the brief time at the disposal of the authorities it was impossible to obtain quarters for the school which were altogether satisfactory, but since the opening the facilities have been greatly improved, and no pains have been spared in equipping the school, to make the instruction thorough, complete, and practical.

The course of study at present consists of a three years graded course of didactic and clinical lectures and recitations, but after this year a four years course will be required.

During the past year the clinical and other advantages have been greatly increased, so that the school is prepared to offer every opportunity needed by the undergraduate in medicine. The corps of instruction has been also strengthened by the addition to the Faculty of such well-known men as Samuel G. Webber, A. B., M. D., Professor of Neurology; Ernest W. Cushing, A. B., M. D., Professor of Gynæcology; Arthur E. Austin, A. B., M. D., Professor of Medical

87

Chemistry; Charles A. Pitkin, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of General Chemistry; Harold Williams, A. B., M. D., Clinical Professor of Pediatrics; John A. Tenney, M. D., Professor of Ophthalmology; John L. Hildreth, A. B., M. D., Professor of Clinical Medicine; Herbert L. Smith, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical Surgery; Thomas M. Durell, M. D., Professor of Medical Jurisprudence; and Frederick L. Jack, M. D., Professor of Otology; and to the list of instructors, lecturers, and assistants, William R. Woodbury, A. B., M. D., George A. Webster, M. D., Fred H. Morse, M. D., Frank B. Brown, M. D., William P. Derby, M. D., Charles G. Cumston, M. D., E. C. Stowell, M. D., Albert E. Rogers, M. D., T. A. Mighill, Ph. D., T. F. Greene, M. D., J. C. D. Clark, M. D., H. S. Dearing, M. D., H. W. White, M. D., W. J. Otis, M. D., and W. S. Boardman, M. D. Professor J. S. Kingsley, of the College of Letters, served as lecturer on Histology during the first two years of the school, being succeeded by G. A. Bates, D. D. S., in 1895.

The enrolment of students for the college year 1893-94 was eighty, and twenty-two were graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine at Commencement in June, 1894, eight of this number being women.

For 1894-95, ninety-six students were entered, the graduating class numbering nineteen, while for the present year (1895-96) there are one hundred and seventy-three matriculates.

Owing to the rapid increase in students, the building, although the school occupies three complete stories, including lecture rooms, laboratories, reading rooms, dissecting room, etc., has become overcrowded, and a hall on the corner of Boylston and Tremont Streets has been leased as an additional lecture room.

As the school is the only co-educational school in New England which is recognized by the Massachusetts Medical Society, it has a field of its own. This, with the certainty of

88

a new building very soon, with the constantly increasing clinical advantages, with the hearty indorsement of the medical profession in this part of the country, and the rapid increase in the number of students, assures a brilliant and prosperous future for Tufts College Medical School.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE.
collapseHISTORICAL NARRATIVE
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE DIVINITY SCHOOL
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.
collapseFRATERNITIES,REPRESENTED AT TUFTS COLLEGE, IN THE ORDER OF THEIR ESTABLISHMENT.
collapseTRUSTEES AND OTHER OFFICERS

Published by the Class of 1897. The original contains appendices with a directory of alumni, the college catalog, and the college charter. These were not included in this addition.

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