History of Tufts College, 1854-1896

Start, Alaric Bertrand
1896

BENJAMIN G. BROWN, A. M.

BENJAMIN G. BROWN, A. M.

Moses T Brown Benjamin G. Brown BENJAMIN GRAVES BROWN was born in Marblehead, Massachusetts, February 22, 1837. He attended the common schools of his native town, and later spent one year at the Marblehead Academy. The boy had not progressed very far in the elements of knowledge before he made up his mind to have a college education. An exceptional opportunity was offered him for preparation, as Latin, Greek, and several other branches required for admission to college had just been introduced into the grammar school. In 1854, at the age of seventeen, he entered Harvard College. While there he joined the Zeta Psi Fraternity, and was also a member of the Sophomore Society, being its librarian during his Junior year.

In the November following his graduation in 1858, he was elected Principal of the Marblehead Academy, which position he occupied for three years. At the end of this time he decided to abandon teaching and begin the study of Medicine, but this plan was suddenly changed by a call to Tufts, which he received through Professor Marshall, in whose hands the management of the college had been placed after the death of President Ballou. Mr. Brown came to the Hill in 1861 as Tutor to the Freshmen and Sophomores in Mathematics and to the Juniors in Mechanics and Physics. After taking up his work at Tufts, he pursued a two years course of study at the Lawrence Scientific School in Cambridge. He received the degree of A. M. from Tufts in 1865.

Mr. Brown was married, February 12, 1863, to Miss Rosalia Glenton, and they now have two children, - a son, who graduated from Tufts in 1888, and a daughter, now the wife of Assistant Professor Durkee, who enjoys the distinction of being the first Alumna of the college, having graduated in 1893.

In 1865, when his three years' appointment as Instructor had expired, Mr. Brown was elected Walker Professor of Mathematics. The classes in Physics and Astronomy were also intrusted to him, and for a time he taught one of the Latin classes; but when Mr. Dolbear was made Professor of Physics in 1874, he was relieved of all courses except those in Mathematics. He is still at the head of this department in both the Academic and Engineering courses.

With the exception of two years, Professor Brown was a member of the Somerville School Committee from 1872 to 1889; and he has always taken an active interest in municipal affairs. Unlike so many mathematicians, he has never been narrowed by his specialty, and his scholarship is comprehensive and thorough. He requires a great deal from his classes, but is just and fair in his estimation of all work, and with kind-hearted sympathy is always ready to stretch out a helping hand to those who stumble on the somewhat difficult mathematical roadway.

BENJAMIN GRAVES BROWN was born in Marblehead, Massachusetts, February 22, 1837. He attended the common schools of his native town, and later spent one year at the Marblehead Academy. The boy had not progressed very far in the elements of knowledge before he made up his mind to have a college education. An exceptional opportunity was offered him for preparation, as Latin, Greek, and several other branches required for admission to college had just been introduced into the grammar school. In 1854, at the age of seventeen, he entered Harvard College. While there he joined the Zeta Psi Fraternity, and was also a member of the Sophomore Society, being its librarian during his Junior year.

In the November following his graduation in 1858, he was elected Principal of the Marblehead Academy, which position he occupied for three years. At the end of this time he decided to abandon teaching and begin the study of Medicine, but this plan was suddenly changed by a call to Tufts, which he received through Professor Marshall, in whose hands the management of the college had been placed after the death of President Ballou. Mr. Brown came to the Hill in 1861 as Tutor to the Freshmen and Sophomores in Mathematics and to the Juniors in Mechanics and Physics. After taking up his work at Tufts, he pursued a two years course of study at the Lawrence Scientific School in Cambridge. He received the degree of A. M. from Tufts in 1865.

Mr. Brown was married, February 12, 1863, to Miss Rosalia Glenton, and they now have two children, - a son, who graduated from Tufts in 1888, and a daughter, now the

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wife of Assistant Professor Durkee, who enjoys the distinction of being the first Alumna of the college, having graduated in 1893.

In 1865, when his three years' appointment as Instructor had expired, Mr. Brown was elected Walker Professor of Mathematics. The classes in Physics and Astronomy were also intrusted to him, and for a time he taught one of the Latin classes; but when Mr. Dolbear was made Professor of Physics in 1874, he was relieved of all courses except those in Mathematics. He is still at the head of this department in both the Academic and Engineering courses.

With the exception of two years, Professor Brown was a member of the Somerville School Committee from 1872 to 1889; and he has always taken an active interest in municipal affairs. Unlike so many mathematicians, he has never been narrowed by his specialty, and his scholarship is comprehensive and thorough. He requires a great deal from his classes, but is just and fair in his estimation of all work, and with kind-hearted sympathy is always ready to stretch out a helping hand to those who stumble on the somewhat difficult mathematical roadway.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE.
collapseHISTORICAL NARRATIVE
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE DIVINITY SCHOOL
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.
collapseFRATERNITIES,REPRESENTED AT TUFTS COLLEGE, IN THE ORDER OF THEIR ESTABLISHMENT.
collapseTRUSTEES AND OTHER OFFICERS

Published by the Class of 1897. The original contains appendices with a directory of alumni, the college catalog, and the college charter. These were not included in this addition.

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ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00091
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