History of Tufts College, 1854-1896

Start, Alaric Bertrand
1896

MOSES TRUE BROWN, A. M.

MOSES TRUE BROWN, A. M.

MOSES TRUE BROWN was born in Deerfield, New Hampshire, on the fourth day of March, 1827. His early education was obtained at home, where he fitted to enter the Junior Class of Dartmouth College at the age of seventeen. The death of his father, however, obliged him to relinquish the idea of a college course; and he at once became a teacher.

At the age of twenty-two he was elected Principal of a grammar school in Manchester, New Hampshire. From there he was called to the principalship of the High School at New Britain, Connecticut, and thence to the superintendency of the public schools of Toledo, Ohio.

While at Toledo he was married, on July 9, 1863, to Miss Cora Barney, of Sandusky, and not long afterward accepted the position of literary critic in the publishing house of Sargent, Willson & Hinkle at Cincinnati.

In 1866 Mr. Brown was called to the chair of Oratory at Tufts, and began his work at the Hill in September of the same year.

During his term of service at Tufts, which lasted until October, 1890, Professor Brown was very popular among the students, and he made the standard of his department extremely high. The number of exceptionally fine speakers who appeared in the annual prize contests during his professorship bore witness to his teaching ability. In 1867 the college conferred upon him the degree of A. M.

While still at Tufts, Professor Brown was, from 1870 to 1874, teacher of elocution in the Boston public schools, a position in which he succeeded Lewis B. Monroe. In 1884 he opened the Boston School of Oratory, and it was in order to devote his entire energies to this that he resigned his position at Tufts in 1890. He was at once elected Professor Emeritus, Professor Maulsby assuming the active position.

After making a notable success of the School of Oratory, Professor Brown decided, in 1894, to abandon it and go to the West, which he did, taking up his residence in Sandusky, the former home of his wife. There he is very successful giving various courses independently at different institutions, -a line of work for which extensive experience in Teachers' Institute courses in Maine, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Ohio has eminently fitted him.

Professor Brown is the author of an able work entitled "The Synthetic Philosophy of Expression." He is President of the Joe Jefferson Dramatic Club of Sandusky, and has been prominent in the Central, Shakespeare, and Metaphysical Clubs of Boston, the New Hampshire Club, and several other organizations of a social and literary character. For many years, during his residence in Boston, he was wont to read Dickens's "Christmas Carol" before the Boston Young Men's Christian Union, an institution which he also often favored with lectures.

MOSES TRUE BROWN was born in Deerfield, New Hampshire, on the fourth day of March, 1827. His early education was obtained at home, where he fitted to enter the Junior Class of Dartmouth College at the age of seventeen. The death of his father, however, obliged him to relinquish the idea of a college course; and he at once became a teacher.

At the age of twenty-two he was elected Principal of a grammar school in Manchester, New Hampshire. From

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there he was called to the principalship of the High School at New Britain, Connecticut, and thence to the superintendency of the public schools of Toledo, Ohio.

While at Toledo he was married, on July 9, 1863, to Miss Cora Barney, of Sandusky, and not long afterward accepted the position of literary critic in the publishing house of Sargent, Willson & Hinkle at Cincinnati.

In 1866 Mr. Brown was called to the chair of Oratory at Tufts, and began his work at the Hill in September of the same year.

During his term of service at Tufts, which lasted until October, 1890, Professor Brown was very popular among the students, and he made the standard of his department extremely high. The number of exceptionally fine speakers who appeared in the annual prize contests during his professorship bore witness to his teaching ability. In 1867 the college conferred upon him the degree of A. M.

While still at Tufts, Professor Brown was, from 1870 to 1874, teacher of elocution in the Boston public schools, a position in which he succeeded Lewis B. Monroe. In 1884 he opened the Boston School of Oratory, and it was in order to devote his entire energies to this that he resigned his position at Tufts in 1890. He was at once elected Professor Emeritus, Professor Maulsby assuming the active position.

After making a notable success of the School of Oratory, Professor Brown decided, in 1894, to abandon it and go to the West, which he did, taking up his residence in Sandusky, the former home of his wife. There he is very successful giving various courses independently at different institutions, -a line of work for which extensive experience in Teachers' Institute courses in Maine, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Ohio has eminently fitted him.

Professor Brown is the author of an able work entitled "The Synthetic Philosophy of Expression." He is President of the Joe Jefferson Dramatic Club of Sandusky,

122

and has been prominent in the Central, Shakespeare, and Metaphysical Clubs of Boston, the New Hampshire Club, and several other organizations of a social and literary character. For many years, during his residence in Boston, he was wont to read Dickens's "Christmas Carol" before the Boston Young Men's Christian Union, an institution which he also often favored with lectures.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE.
collapseHISTORICAL NARRATIVE
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE DIVINITY SCHOOL
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.
collapseFRATERNITIES,REPRESENTED AT TUFTS COLLEGE, IN THE ORDER OF THEIR ESTABLISHMENT.
collapseTRUSTEES AND OTHER OFFICERS

Published by the Class of 1897. The original contains appendices with a directory of alumni, the college catalog, and the college charter. These were not included in this addition.

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ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00091
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