History of Tufts College, 1854-1896

Start, Alaric Bertrand
1896

J. STERLING KINGSLEY, S. D.

J. STERLING KINGSLEY, S. D.

JOHN STERLING KINGSLEY was born in Cincinnatus, New York, April 7, 1854. His father, who was then County Judge and Surrogate, moved to Norwich for professional reasons two years after the birth of his son. Here the boy grew up, gaining his early education at private schools. From his earliest years he was intensely interested in scientific subjects; chemistry soon becoming his favorite study.

After attending the academies at Norwich and Cincinnatus for some time, he took up special studies in engineering. He refused an appointment to the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, and entered the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. The death of his father forced him to leave the Institute without completing his course; but his engineering training now stood him in good stead, for after a year and a half of steady work in this line he was enabled to resume his studies, and entered the Junior Class of Williams College in the Fall of 1873. About this time he became strongly attracted to the study of medicine, and devoted much time to it while pursuing the regular college work.

His connection with the Natural History Society of the college, however, caused him to decide upon biology as his life study; and upon his graduation in 1875 he went to the Peabody Academy of Science at Salem, Massachusetts, where he studied with Dr. A. S. Packard, now at Brown University. Here his work was entirely in the line of systematic zoology, especially in the group of Crustacea, with regard to which he published a number of papers.

In 1878 he was located at Providence, Rhode Island, as an assistant on the United States Entomological Commission; and the following year he went to the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Science, where he took up the study of general morphology.

During this time he supported himself by drawing scientific illustrations and by writing articles for compensation whenever he had the opportunity.

He first became generally known through his work on the "Standard Natural History," in editing which he was engaged from 1882 to 1885. At the same time he was studying under the direction of the Princeton Faculty, and in 1885 he received his Doctorate of Science from the College of New Jersey.

In 1886 Dr. Kingsley became editor of the "American Naturalist," - a position which he still holds. For the next two years he was at the University of Indiana as Professor of Zoology, leaving that place to accept the chair of Biology at the University of Nebraska. In 1891 he resigned this position to study for a year in Europe, chiefly at Frieburg under Robert Wiedersheim.

Soon after his return from Europe in 1892, Dr. Kingsley was tendered the chair of Biology at Tufts. He at once accepted the position, and has since been untiring in his endeavors for the advancement of his department. He found it with very insufficient laboratory facilities; but the new wing of the Museum, designed under his direction, could scarcely be improved. His dominant characteristic may be said to be the ability to impart his own enthusiasm to all those connected with his department.

Professor Kingsley has been a prolific writer in the scientific field. Since coming to Tufts he has, among other things, written nearly all the biological articles for the new edition of Johnson's Cyclopædia.

Dr. Kinsgley was married, January 31, 1882, to Miss Mary Emma Reed, of Salem, and they have one daughter.

JOHN STERLING KINGSLEY was born in Cincinnatus, New York, April 7, 1854. His father, who was then County Judge and Surrogate, moved to Norwich for professional reasons two years after the birth of his son. Here the boy grew up, gaining his early education at private schools. From his earliest years he was intensely interested in scientific subjects; chemistry soon becoming his favorite study.

After attending the academies at Norwich and Cincinnatus

139

for some time, he took up special studies in engineering. He refused an appointment to the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, and entered the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. The death of his father forced him to leave the Institute without completing his course; but his engineering training now stood him in good stead, for after a year and a half of steady work in this line he was enabled to resume his studies, and entered the Junior Class of Williams College in the Fall of 1873. About this time he became strongly attracted to the study of medicine, and devoted much time to it while pursuing the regular college work.

His connection with the Natural History Society of the college, however, caused him to decide upon biology as his life study; and upon his graduation in 1875 he went to the Peabody Academy of Science at Salem, Massachusetts, where he studied with Dr. A. S. Packard, now at Brown University. Here his work was entirely in the line of systematic zoology, especially in the group of Crustacea, with regard to which he published a number of papers.

In 1878 he was located at Providence, Rhode Island, as an assistant on the United States Entomological Commission; and the following year he went to the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Science, where he took up the study of general morphology.

During this time he supported himself by drawing scientific illustrations and by writing articles for compensation whenever he had the opportunity.

He first became generally known through his work on the "Standard Natural History," in editing which he was engaged from 1882 to 1885. At the same time he was studying under the direction of the Princeton Faculty, and in 1885 he received his Doctorate of Science from the College of New Jersey.

In 1886 Dr. Kingsley became editor of the "American Naturalist," - a position which he still holds. For the next two years he was at the University of Indiana as Professor

140

of Zoology, leaving that place to accept the chair of Biology at the University of Nebraska. In 1891 he resigned this position to study for a year in Europe, chiefly at Frieburg under Robert Wiedersheim.

Soon after his return from Europe in 1892, Dr. Kingsley was tendered the chair of Biology at Tufts. He at once accepted the position, and has since been untiring in his endeavors for the advancement of his department. He found it with very insufficient laboratory facilities; but the new wing of the Museum, designed under his direction, could scarcely be improved. His dominant characteristic may be said to be the ability to impart his own enthusiasm to all those connected with his department.

Professor Kingsley has been a prolific writer in the scientific field. Since coming to Tufts he has, among other things, written nearly all the biological articles for the new edition of Johnson's Cyclopædia.

Dr. Kinsgley was married, January 31, 1882, to Miss Mary Emma Reed, of Salem, and they have one daughter.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE.
collapseHISTORICAL NARRATIVE
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE DIVINITY SCHOOL
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.
collapseFRATERNITIES,REPRESENTED AT TUFTS COLLEGE, IN THE ORDER OF THEIR ESTABLISHMENT.
collapseTRUSTEES AND OTHER OFFICERS

Published by the Class of 1897. The original contains appendices with a directory of alumni, the college catalog, and the college charter. These were not included in this addition.

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