History of Tufts College, 1854-1896

Start, Alaric Bertrand
1896

ARTHUR MICHAEL, PH. D.

ARTHUR MICHAEL, PH. D.

Arthur Michael

Leo R. Lewis

ARTHUR MICHAEL was born in Buffalo, New York, August 7, 1853, and received his preliminary education largely in private schools.

On account of ill health he went to Germany in August, 1870, where, after recovering from a severe attack of brain fever, he matriculated at the University of Berlin, making Chemistry his principal work. After one year of study here he spent two years at Heidelberg, and then returned to Berlin, where he remained for four years more. While in Germany he enjoyed the instruction of such master scientists as Robert Bunsen, Hoffman, and Helmholtz, and attended the lectures of Kirschoff, Dobe, and others of equal note. In 1879 he went to Paris, where he attended the école de Médecine for one year, and also studied in the laboratory of A. D. Wurtz.

Returning to America he was appointed Assistant in the Chemical Laboratory at Tufts in 1881, and a year later was chosen Professor of Chemistry to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Professor Pitman. He occupied the chair of Chemistry for eight years, and during that time made the laboratory at Tufts famous as the seat of notable research work. He received the degree of A. M. from Tufts in 1882, and that of Ph. D. in 1890.

In 1888 Professor Michael was offered the position of Chief Chemist at Clark University. At first he refused the offer, but in 1890 decided to accept it.

Professor Michael married Miss Helen Abbot, and in 1889 they started on a tour around the world, spending eighteen months in Europe, Asia, and Africa. Dr. Michael is an enthusiastic mountaineer, and has ascended the Matterhorn and several other Alpine peaks.

Returning to this country in 1890, he occupied the position at Clark University for a few months, after which he went to the Isle of Wight, where he established a private laboratory, and spent his time in original research for four years. In the Spring of 1894 he was invited to resume his former position at Tufts, and in the Fall he took up his work in the new chemical laboratory, where he devotes himself entirely to the graduate department.

Dr. Michael is a member of the National Academy of Science, and at the time of his election had published no less than seventy papers. His specialty is Organic Chemistry, treated from the theoretical standpoint, and by a steady application and thorough devotion to his work he has obtained an undisputed position as the foremost chemist in the country. He is an honorary member of the local chapter of Phi Beta Kappa.

ARTHUR MICHAEL was born in Buffalo, New York, August 7, 1853, and received his preliminary education largely in private schools.

On account of ill health he went to Germany in August, 1870, where, after recovering from a severe attack of brain fever, he matriculated at the University of Berlin, making Chemistry his principal work. After one year of study here he spent two years at Heidelberg, and then returned to Berlin, where he remained for four years more. While in Germany he enjoyed the instruction of such master scientists as Robert Bunsen, Hoffman, and Helmholtz, and attended the lectures of Kirschoff, Dobe, and others of equal note. In 1879 he went to Paris, where he attended the école de Médecine for one year, and also studied in the laboratory of A. D. Wurtz.

Returning to America he was appointed Assistant in the Chemical Laboratory at Tufts in 1881, and a year later was chosen Professor of Chemistry to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Professor Pitman. He occupied the chair of Chemistry for eight years, and during that time made the laboratory at Tufts famous as the seat of notable research work. He received the degree of A. M. from Tufts in 1882, and that of Ph. D. in 1890.

In 1888 Professor Michael was offered the position of Chief Chemist at Clark University. At first he refused the offer, but in 1890 decided to accept it.

Professor Michael married Miss Helen Abbot, and in 1889 they started on a tour around the world, spending eighteen months in Europe, Asia, and Africa. Dr. Michael is an

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enthusiastic mountaineer, and has ascended the Matterhorn and several other Alpine peaks.

Returning to this country in 1890, he occupied the position at Clark University for a few months, after which he went to the Isle of Wight, where he established a private laboratory, and spent his time in original research for four years. In the Spring of 1894 he was invited to resume his former position at Tufts, and in the Fall he took up his work in the new chemical laboratory, where he devotes himself entirely to the graduate department.

Dr. Michael is a member of the National Academy of Science, and at the time of his election had published no less than seventy papers. His specialty is Organic Chemistry, treated from the theoretical standpoint, and by a steady application and thorough devotion to his work he has obtained an undisputed position as the foremost chemist in the country. He is an honorary member of the local chapter of Phi Beta Kappa.

 
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 Dedication
 PREFACE.
collapseHISTORICAL NARRATIVE
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE DIVINITY SCHOOL
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.
collapseFRATERNITIES,REPRESENTED AT TUFTS COLLEGE, IN THE ORDER OF THEIR ESTABLISHMENT.
collapseTRUSTEES AND OTHER OFFICERS

Published by the Class of 1897. The original contains appendices with a directory of alumni, the college catalog, and the college charter. These were not included in this addition.

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ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00091
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