History of Tufts College, 1854-1896

Start, Alaric Bertrand
1896

JEROME SCHNEIDER, PH. D.

JEROME SCHNEIDER, PH. D.

JEROME SCHNEIDER was born September 30, 1824, at Basel, Switzerland. His early education was received in the public schools of his native city, where he attended the primary grade until he was nine years old. He spent six years at the Gymnasium, graduating there in 1839 to enter the Pædagogium, a higher preparatory school.

In 1842 he was admitted to the University of Basel, where he studied Theology and Philology, devoting a great deal of his time to the study of the Hebrew language. Here he enjoyed the teaching of Professor Hagenback, a prominent church historian, and Professor De Wette, one of the foremost liberal theologians of his time.

He continued his studies in 1845-46 at the University of Berlin, receiving instruction from Professor Zumpt, author of the famous Latin grammar, and Professor Boekh, a leading Greek scholar. He studied Sanscrit for one term, and ancient art under Professors Panofka and Gerhard. While at Berlin he was cast to play the part of Phædromus in the "Curculio " of Plautus, which was produced in Latin before a distinguished audience.

Herr Schneider returned to Basel in 1846, continuing his studies of Ancient and Modern Languages, and teaching at the same time in the Gymnasium. In 1850 he received the degree of Ph. D. from the University of Basel.

Dr. Schneider came to America in 1854, settling in Boston. From 1854 to 1856 he was instructor in Modern Languages in various private schools of Boston. At one of these he met Professor Tweed, and through him obtained an introduction to the late Prof. E. W. Gurney, of Harvard. Through the kindness of the latter he had access to the recitations of several professors at the college, thereby obtaining an insight into American methods of instruction.

In 1856 he was appointed instructor of Modern Languages and Latin at Amherst College during the absence of Professor Tyler in Europe. While there he became an honorary member of the Amherst Chapter of Psi Upsilon.

On returning to Boston he made, through Professor Tweed, the acquaintance of President Ballou, and received the appointment of Instructor in Modern Languages at Tufts in 1856. At this time he was also appointed Instructor in Classics and Gymnastics, and in 1860 was made Professor of the Greek Language and Literature, but he continued to teach French and German until 1869.

Owing to loss of health he returned to his native country in 1881, on a year's leave of absence. Regaining his strength he travelled through Switzerland, Italy, Germany, France, and England. He spent most of his time, however, in Germany, visiting the Gymnasia and universities, and there listening to recitations in various departments. He returned to Tufts in 1882. He has been a widower for some years. He has one daughter, the wife of the Rev. Alexander F. Walsh, who graduated from the Divinity School in 1886.

JEROME SCHNEIDER was born September 30, 1824, at Basel, Switzerland. His early education was received in the public schools of his native city, where he attended the primary grade until he was nine years old. He spent six years at the Gymnasium, graduating there in 1839 to enter the Pædagogium, a higher preparatory school.

In 1842 he was admitted to the University of Basel, where he studied Theology and Philology, devoting a great deal of his time to the study of the Hebrew language. Here he enjoyed the teaching of Professor Hagenback, a prominent church historian, and Professor De Wette, one of the foremost liberal theologians of his time.

He continued his studies in 1845-46 at the University of Berlin, receiving instruction from Professor Zumpt, author of the famous Latin grammar, and Professor Boekh, a leading Greek scholar. He studied Sanscrit for one term, and ancient art under Professors Panofka and Gerhard. While at Berlin he was cast to play the part of Phædromus in the "Curculio " of Plautus, which was produced in Latin before a distinguished audience.

Herr Schneider returned to Basel in 1846, continuing his studies of Ancient and Modern Languages, and teaching at the same time in the Gymnasium. In 1850 he received the degree of Ph. D. from the University of Basel.

Dr. Schneider came to America in 1854, settling in Boston. From 1854 to 1856 he was instructor in Modern Languages in various private schools of Boston. At one of these he met Professor Tweed, and through him obtained an introduction to the late Prof. E. W. Gurney, of Harvard. Through the kindness of the latter he had access to the recitations of several professors at the college, thereby obtaining an insight into American methods of instruction.

In 1856 he was appointed instructor of Modern Languages and Latin at Amherst College during the absence of Professor Tyler in Europe. While there he became an honorary member of the Amherst Chapter of Psi Upsilon.

On returning to Boston he made, through Professor Tweed, the acquaintance of President Ballou, and received the appointment of Instructor in Modern Languages at Tufts in 1856. At this time he was also appointed Instructor in Classics and Gymnastics, and in 1860 was made Professor of the Greek Language and Literature, but he continued to teach French and German until 1869.

Owing to loss of health he returned to his native country in 1881, on a year's leave of absence. Regaining his strength he travelled through Switzerland, Italy, Germany, France, and England. He spent most of his time, however, in Germany, visiting the Gymnasia and universities, and there listening to recitations in various departments. He returned to Tufts in 1882. He has been a widower for some years. He has one daughter, the wife of the Rev. Alexander F. Walsh, who graduated from the Divinity School in 1886.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE.
collapseHISTORICAL NARRATIVE
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE DIVINITY SCHOOL
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.
collapseFRATERNITIES,REPRESENTED AT TUFTS COLLEGE, IN THE ORDER OF THEIR ESTABLISHMENT.
collapseTRUSTEES AND OTHER OFFICERS

Published by the Class of 1897. The original contains appendices with a directory of alumni, the college catalog, and the college charter. These were not included in this addition.

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ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00091
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