History of Tufts College, 1854-1896

Start, Alaric Bertrand
1896

WILLIAM G. TOUSEY, A. M., B. D.

WILLIAM G. TOUSEY, A. M., B. D.

WILLIAM GEORGE TOUSEY was born at Portage, New York, September 22, 1842. He was, by the death of his father, early thrown on his own resources, which seem to have consisted chiefly of a good moral character, a determination to get an education, and a not very robust physique.

The program of his early years was mainly made up of hard work, - on a farm in summer, in the country schools in winter. He soon found employment at teaching school, however, and thus accumulated sufficient money to enable him to enter the Nunda Literary Institute. It was during his course there that the war broke out, and the young student, failing to get admission to the company which was organized in his native village in response to the first call for troops, hastened first to Philadelphia, and then to New York, where he at last succeeded in obtaining a footing in the Union navy. Having served out the term of his enlistment, principally in the Eastern Gulf Squadron, he resumed his studies, and shortly after was made Principal of the Nunda High School.

He resigned this position to enter Tufts College in the Fall of 1865, but renewed his teaching during his college life, being engaged one winter in Danvers and one in Medford. He also increased his income by practising stenography, being noted in this, as in all else he undertook, for remarkable accuracy. Although faithful, and to an exceptional degree successful in all departments of his college work, the future professor's tastes found their most congenial employment in those studies of which he has made himself such a masterly instructor, - philosophy and the mental sciences.

In his Junior year he was chosen anniversary orator of the Mathetican Society, and among other honors achieved during his course were a Junior prize in oratory and a Senior prize for dissertation, his subject being characteristic: "The Relation of Æsthetics to Mental Development."

In athletics he took an active interest, becoming an adept at fencing. But his favorite recreation was, and still is, yachting; he is a thorough Corinthian yachtsman, his summers being often spent in cruising along the New England coast. His skill with a rifle, also, is well worthy of mention.

Graduating from the college in 1869, with the degree of A. B., he at once entered the Divinity School, just opened, he and three others composing its first class.

In 1872 he graduated with the degrees of A. M. and B. D., and accepted a call to Chelsea, the society so long presided over by Dr. Leonard. His stay here was brief: the growth of the Divinity School made another instructor necessary, and Mr. Tousey was selected as the proper man for the place. Accordingly, the opening of the school in 1872 found him duly installed as Instructor in Psychology and Natural Theology, and in the catalogue of the following year his name appears as Professor Tousey. Psychology, Logic, Ethics, and the Philosophy of Theism are the studies through which he has guided students with rare skill and tact. Professor Tousey was one of the organizing members of Phi Beta Kappa at Tufts.

In 1875 he was married to Miss Kate 0. Hall, of Cambridge, and to them have been born a son and two daughters.

WILLIAM GEORGE TOUSEY was born at Portage, New York, September 22, 1842. He was, by the death of his father, early thrown on his own resources, which seem to have consisted chiefly of a good moral character, a determination to get an education, and a not very robust physique.

The program of his early years was mainly made up of hard work, - on a farm in summer, in the country schools in winter. He soon found employment at teaching school, however, and thus accumulated sufficient money to enable him to enter the Nunda Literary Institute. It was during his course there that the war broke out, and the young student, failing to get admission to the company which was organized in his native village in response to the first call for troops, hastened first to Philadelphia, and then to New

174

York, where he at last succeeded in obtaining a footing in the Union navy. Having served out the term of his enlistment, principally in the Eastern Gulf Squadron, he resumed his studies, and shortly after was made Principal of the Nunda High School.

He resigned this position to enter Tufts College in the Fall of 1865, but renewed his teaching during his college life, being engaged one winter in Danvers and one in Medford. He also increased his income by practising stenography, being noted in this, as in all else he undertook, for remarkable accuracy. Although faithful, and to an exceptional degree successful in all departments of his college work, the future professor's tastes found their most congenial employment in those studies of which he has made himself such a masterly instructor, - philosophy and the mental sciences.

In his Junior year he was chosen anniversary orator of the Mathetican Society, and among other honors achieved during his course were a Junior prize in oratory and a Senior prize for dissertation, his subject being characteristic: "The Relation of Æsthetics to Mental Development."

In athletics he took an active interest, becoming an adept at fencing. But his favorite recreation was, and still is, yachting; he is a thorough Corinthian yachtsman, his summers being often spent in cruising along the New England coast. His skill with a rifle, also, is well worthy of mention.

Graduating from the college in 1869, with the degree of A. B., he at once entered the Divinity School, just opened, he and three others composing its first class.

In 1872 he graduated with the degrees of A. M. and B. D., and accepted a call to Chelsea, the society so long presided over by Dr. Leonard. His stay here was brief: the growth of the Divinity School made another instructor necessary, and Mr. Tousey was selected as the proper man for the place. Accordingly, the opening of the school in 1872 found him

175

duly installed as Instructor in Psychology and Natural Theology, and in the catalogue of the following year his name appears as Professor Tousey. Psychology, Logic, Ethics, and the Philosophy of Theism are the studies through which he has guided students with rare skill and tact. Professor Tousey was one of the organizing members of Phi Beta Kappa at Tufts.

In 1875 he was married to Miss Kate 0. Hall, of Cambridge, and to them have been born a son and two daughters.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE.
collapseHISTORICAL NARRATIVE
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE DIVINITY SCHOOL
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.
collapseFRATERNITIES,REPRESENTED AT TUFTS COLLEGE, IN THE ORDER OF THEIR ESTABLISHMENT.
collapseTRUSTEES AND OTHER OFFICERS

Published by the Class of 1897. The original contains appendices with a directory of alumni, the college catalog, and the college charter. These were not included in this addition.

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ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00091
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