History of Tufts College, 1854-1896

Start, Alaric Bertrand
1896

GEORGE T. KNIGHT, D. D.

GEORGE T. KNIGHT, D. D.

GEORGE THOMPSON KNIGHT was born in Windham, Maine, October 29, 1850.

His parents were farming people, the family a large one, and the boy's early years were spent in hard work, with little recreation.

His father was an Abolitionist and a Universalist, in the days when it required courage to be either, and the rugged strength of his character was his principal legacy to his son.

With a natural taste for learning and a determination to get it, George made the most of the few months each year at the district school, and with this aid, still more by the help of an elder sister, and most of all by his own faithful application, he fitted himself to enter Westbrook Seminary.

Here during several winter terms he studied, until at seventeen he was fitted for college, and entered Tufts in the Fall of 1868.

Here hard and faithful work not only overcame the deficiencies of his preparation, but put him, before he left the college, in the first rank of his class. In the list of prize awards in the catalogue appear two "firsts" in elocution awarded to him.

In 1872 he graduated from the college, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and in the Fall of the same year he entered the divinity school as a member of the Junior class.

Here he remained three years, graduating in 1875, with the degrees of Master of Arts and Bachelor of Divinity.

Immediately after graduation he was appointed Instructor in Rhetoric and Church History, the duties of which position George T. Knight George M. Harmon he entered upon with the opening of the college year 1875-76.

We should fail to do justice to our subject if we neglected to record his success in another field. For the recitation room did not witness all his victories: some of his hardest-earned laurels were won on the campus. He became a leader in athletic affairs, especially in baseball, playing for four years on the Varsity team with great distinction. But the honor of being the best player in college was worn with characteristic modesty.

During his first year as an instructor, Mr. Knight taught not only Rhetoric and Church History, but Biblical History and Greek.

The "all-roundness" of his scholarship is shown by the fact that during his twenty years of service he has taught, either regularly or as a substitute, almost every branch now taught in the school.

In 1876 he was ordained, and the next year he was married to Miss Alice Sawyer, daughter of Dr. Sawyer, then senior professor and Dean of the School. They have two sons and two daughters, the elder of the latter being now a member of the Freshman Class in the Course of Liberal Arts.

In 1883 Instructor Knight became Professor Knight, and the following year he was made Secretary of the Faculty of the Divinity School, a position which he still holds; discharging its numerous and trying duties with his characteristic accuracy and care, in addition to his work as Professor of Church History, and in the departments of Systematic Theology and Comparative Theology, of which he has charge.

Professor Knight was one of the first members of the local chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. In June, 1893, Lombard University conferred on him the degree of Doctor of Divinity.

Amid all his other duties Professor Knight has found time for a large amount of literary work, attaining distinction especially as a student of Ruskin.

GEORGE THOMPSON KNIGHT was born in Windham, Maine, October 29, 1850.

His parents were farming people, the family a large one, and the boy's early years were spent in hard work, with little recreation.

His father was an Abolitionist and a Universalist, in the days when it required courage to be either, and the rugged strength of his character was his principal legacy to his son.

With a natural taste for learning and a determination to get it, George made the most of the few months each year at the district school, and with this aid, still more by the help of an elder sister, and most of all by his own faithful application, he fitted himself to enter Westbrook Seminary.

Here during several winter terms he studied, until at seventeen he was fitted for college, and entered Tufts in the Fall of 1868.

Here hard and faithful work not only overcame the deficiencies of his preparation, but put him, before he left the college, in the first rank of his class. In the list of prize awards in the catalogue appear two "firsts" in elocution awarded to him.

In 1872 he graduated from the college, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and in the Fall of the same year he entered the divinity school as a member of the Junior class.

Here he remained three years, graduating in 1875, with the degrees of Master of Arts and Bachelor of Divinity.

Immediately after graduation he was appointed Instructor in Rhetoric and Church History, the duties of which position

177

he entered upon with the opening of the college year 1875-76.

We should fail to do justice to our subject if we neglected to record his success in another field. For the recitation room did not witness all his victories: some of his hardest-earned laurels were won on the campus. He became a leader in athletic affairs, especially in baseball, playing for four years on the Varsity team with great distinction. But the honor of being the best player in college was worn with characteristic modesty.

During his first year as an instructor, Mr. Knight taught not only Rhetoric and Church History, but Biblical History and Greek.

The "all-roundness" of his scholarship is shown by the fact that during his twenty years of service he has taught, either regularly or as a substitute, almost every branch now taught in the school.

In 1876 he was ordained, and the next year he was married to Miss Alice Sawyer, daughter of Dr. Sawyer, then senior professor and Dean of the School. They have two sons and two daughters, the elder of the latter being now a member of the Freshman Class in the Course of Liberal Arts.

In 1883 Instructor Knight became Professor Knight, and the following year he was made Secretary of the Faculty of the Divinity School, a position which he still holds; discharging its numerous and trying duties with his characteristic accuracy and care, in addition to his work as Professor of Church History, and in the departments of Systematic Theology and Comparative Theology, of which he has charge.

Professor Knight was one of the first members of the local chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. In June, 1893, Lombard University conferred on him the degree of Doctor of Divinity.

Amid all his other duties Professor Knight has found time for a large amount of literary work, attaining distinction especially as a student of Ruskin.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE.
collapseHISTORICAL NARRATIVE
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE DIVINITY SCHOOL
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.
collapseFRATERNITIES,REPRESENTED AT TUFTS COLLEGE, IN THE ORDER OF THEIR ESTABLISHMENT.
collapseTRUSTEES AND OTHER OFFICERS

Published by the Class of 1897. The original contains appendices with a directory of alumni, the college catalog, and the college charter. These were not included in this addition.

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ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00091
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