History of Tufts College, 1854-1896

Start, Alaric Bertrand
1896

GEORGE M. HARMON, A. M., B. D.

GEORGE M. HARMON, A. M., B. D.

GEORGE MILFORD HARMON was born in Thorndike, Maine, November 28, 1842. His father was a farmer with limited means; but in 1850 he removed his family to Biddeford, where his children were given the advantages of good schools.

Here the boy became acquainted with many of the men who were interested in the founding of the new college in Medford, among them the Rev. Dr. James P. Wiston, then principal of Westbrook Seminary, who appealed to the boy's natural desire for learning, and urged him to shape his thought toward a college course. But the means for such an undertaking seemed to be beyond his reach, and the desire remained such only, until, in the High School, he came under the influence of Mr. Edward A. Rand, now an Episcopal clergyman in Watertown, Massachusetts. An excellent teacher, kindly, energetic, and faithful, Mr. Rand encouraged a large class of boys to fit for college. Most of them entered Bowdoin, but young Harmon preferred Tufts, which he entered in 1863.

On graduating in 1867, the Divinity School not having yet been established, he entered at once upon his work as a minister in the town of Rochester, Vermont.

But Mr. Harmon felt the need of more thorough professional training, and the feeling grew with every year he spent in his work. So, after preaching three years in Vermont and two in Michigan, he resigned his pastorate and returned for a three years' course in divinity at Tufts. After graduating in 1875 he settled over the church at Adams, Massachusetts. Here he was married to a young lady of his own name, in 1876, and they now have three children. In 1880 he removed to Peabody, Massachusetts, and in 1882 to Galesburg, Illinois, where he was called to the double office of pastor of the church and teacher in the newly-established theological de partment of Lombard University. He remained here till 1884, when he was called to teach in the Divinity School of Tufts College. After Dr. Sawyer relinquished all active work in the class-room, both the theological and Biblical subjects fell to Professor Harmon, and when Theology and Old Testament subjects passed into other hands New Testament Exegesis and Theology remained in his charge, and these are his special subjects in the present apportionment of the theological course.

Professor Harmon was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in 1893.

GEORGE MILFORD HARMON was born in Thorndike, Maine, November 28, 1842. His father was a farmer with limited means; but in 1850 he removed his family to Biddeford, where his children were given the advantages of good schools.

Here the boy became acquainted with many of the men who were interested in the founding of the new college in Medford, among them the Rev. Dr. James P. Wiston, then principal of Westbrook Seminary, who appealed to the boy's natural desire for learning, and urged him to shape his thought toward a college course. But the means for such an undertaking seemed to be beyond his reach, and the desire remained such only, until, in the High School, he came under the influence of Mr. Edward A. Rand, now an Episcopal clergyman in Watertown, Massachusetts. An excellent teacher, kindly, energetic, and faithful, Mr. Rand encouraged a large class of boys to fit for college. Most of them entered Bowdoin, but young Harmon preferred Tufts, which he entered in 1863.

On graduating in 1867, the Divinity School not having yet been established, he entered at once upon his work as a minister in the town of Rochester, Vermont.

But Mr. Harmon felt the need of more thorough professional training, and the feeling grew with every year he spent in his work. So, after preaching three years in Vermont and two in Michigan, he resigned his pastorate and returned for a three years' course in divinity at Tufts. After graduating in 1875 he settled over the church at Adams, Massachusetts. Here he was married to a young lady of his own name, in 1876, and they now have three children. In 1880 he removed to Peabody, Massachusetts, and in 1882 to Galesburg, Illinois, where he was called to the double office of pastor of the church and teacher in the newly-established theological de

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partment of Lombard University. He remained here till 1884, when he was called to teach in the Divinity School of Tufts College. After Dr. Sawyer relinquished all active work in the class-room, both the theological and Biblical subjects fell to Professor Harmon, and when Theology and Old Testament subjects passed into other hands New Testament Exegesis and Theology remained in his charge, and these are his special subjects in the present apportionment of the theological course.

Professor Harmon was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in 1893.

 
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 Title Page
 Dedication
 PREFACE.
collapseHISTORICAL NARRATIVE
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE DIVINITY SCHOOL
collapseBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE FACULTY OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.
collapseFRATERNITIES,REPRESENTED AT TUFTS COLLEGE, IN THE ORDER OF THEIR ESTABLISHMENT.
collapseTRUSTEES AND OTHER OFFICERS

Published by the Class of 1897. The original contains appendices with a directory of alumni, the college catalog, and the college charter. These were not included in this addition.

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ID: tufts:UA069.005.DO.00091
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