Department of Greek, 1891-1939


In the early years of the college, Tufts students were expected to be "well sustained in" Greek. The Department of Greek was one of the original Departments of Instruction created for the academic year 1891-1892. As Tufts College transitioned from course of study to major subjects of study in the 1893-1894 academic year, Greek was one of the original twelve offerings. Readings by the leading thinkers of ancient Greece were required, and a composition course was added in 1897. The Greek professor also taught English-language courses concerning ancient Greek life, art and history. These were not always considered part of the Department of Greek, but came under headings such as Classical Civilization. In 1939, the Department of Greek and the Department of Latin united to form the Department of Classics.

History of Department of Greek

Among the subjects that a student was expected to be "well sustained in" during the early years of Tufts College was Greek. The Department of Greek was one of the original Departments of Instruction created for the academic year 1891-1892. Prior to that year, Latin and Greek were requirements in various courses of study, such as the classical course and the philosophical course. According to the 1893-1894 catalogue, Greek was offered as one of the original twelve "major subjects" offered. In addition to emphasizing language skills and acquainting students with the history and literature of ancient Greece, the aim of the department was "to treat the Greek language not merely as a disciplinary instrument, but as a factor in the broadest and most liberal culture" and to "exhibit the indebtedness of modern civilization to Hellenism." Course descriptions listed the authors to be read, such as Homer, Pindar, and Plato.

In the academic year 1897-1898, a course in Greek composition was added. The department began offering courses in Greek literature taught in English in 1920-1921, and 1924-1925 saw the addition of Introduction to the Study of Linguistics. From 1899 until the formation of the Department of Classics, the professors of Greek and Latin also taught English-language courses in subjects such as Greek and/or Roman literature, history, art, drama, pedagogy, and mythology (knowledge of Latin or Greek was not a prerequisite). These courses came under a succession of headings: Classical Archaeology (1899-1911), Classical History and Archaeology (1911-1920), and Classical Civilization (1920-1928). From 1932-1952, Greek and Roman history courses were taught by the Greek and Latin professors for the Department of History. Other classical culture courses were split between the Department of Greek and the Department of Latin.

In 1939, the Department of Greek and the Department of Latin united to form the Department of Classics.

Collections
Relationships
Part of: Followed by: Associated with: